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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Festinate

Festinate, to make haste, is one among many in the category of words whose early recorded use is in the works of William Shakespeare. He used it as an adjective (which is pronounced \FESS-tuh-nut\) in King Lear, for example: "Advise the Duke where you are going, to a most festinate preparation." Perhaps the Bard knew about festinatus, the Latin predecessor of festinate, or was familiar with the Latin proverb festina lente—"make haste slowly." Shakespeare also used the adverb festinatelyin Love's Labour's Lost: "Bring him festinately hither," Don Ariano de Armado orders. First evidence of the verb festinate, meaning "to hasten," occurs post-Shakespeare, however.

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