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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

The state of Oregon seems to be under the impression that running a God-Awful child welfare department is a good thing


The state of Oregon seems to be under the impression that running a God-Awful child welfare department is a good thing. Their most recent screw up is the credible account of a  14-year-old foster boy that child welfare workers had sex in front of him last year.
According to a state police report child welfare supervisor Mark Walsh and paralegal Kate Guy were having an affair before the night they spent supervising the boy at a hotel. Oregon has a practice of housing children in hotels, state offices and other temporary lodging when state workers cannot find anywhere else for children in the foster system to stay. A year ago, Oregon child welfare leaders signed a court settlement promising to stop housing vulnerable foster children in hotels, state offices and juvenile detention centers instead of with families. Since the settlement, the state has placed dramatically more children and teens in institutional settings including repurposed juvenile jails.
Regarding the child who watched the sex act,  after the state police report was completed, the Oregon Department of Justice declined to file any charges against Walsh and Guy, saying that there was “insufficient evidence to prove criminal charges beyond a reasonable doubt.”
A lawyer for the boy accused the state of sending the boy to a juvenile detention facility as punishment after he reported the incident.
The boy’s caseworker, Jaclyn Trujillo, visited him at the Yamhill County juvenile detention center because it was not clear from the report why the boy was at the detention center.
“During this conversation (the boy) told Trujillo something happened” at the hotel on the night of Nov. 20, but he did not want to disclose what it was, according to the police report.
Eventually, the boy told Trujillo that Walsh and Guy were “doing stuff.” When Trujillo asked if they were having sex, the boy said “yes,” according to the police report. Trujillo immediately reported the allegation to her supervisors. Walsh and Guy were placed on paid leave two days later.
As part of the state police investigation, the boy underwent a child forensic interview at an organization that screens for child abuse. Using dolls, the boy described in detail how the sexual encounter allegedly unfolded in the bed adjacent to his that night at the hotel.

Word origins

The French word bouquiniste, meaning a book or a little book is pronounced “Boo-Ki-Nest and from that, we get the term for a dealer in old and rare books.






*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***



VIOLET SURPRISE: FEMSLASH FEST is a short play festival that reimagines the possibilities for well-known, well-loved female-identifying characters to be in queer relationships, and for those relationships to be parodied positively and within the world of the original fandom.
Whether you're down with OTP (One True Pairing) or you have an entire fleet of 'ships, we invite you to create a Sapphic spoof of the characters' signature sizzle that celebrates and elevates the perfection of their connection.

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Aspiring writers from around the country are encouraged to submit their new works, which will be reviewed by a panel of theatre professionals, including renowned directors, writers, producers and performers. The panel will select one work that will each receive a staged reading, and one final winner will receive a workshop presented of their piece featuring local directors and talent.

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Nylon Fusion Theatre Company is currently accepting submissions of new works for future projects
Labels: 10-minute plays, full-length plays
This Round’s On Us: What's The Big Idea? Festival MYTH Theme- MYTH
What is myth?
What does it mean to you?
Do we need them?
Do they help or hurt?
Bounce off of this word.  Have fun.  Flights of fancy are strongly encouraged!  Don’t limit yourself:  looking at myths from different cultures is fine, but don’t feel that you have to write a play based on a specific.  Although you can if you really feel you want to.

*** For more information about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** THEATRE SUPERSTITIONS ***

9 Theatre Superstitions Explained

Wishing someone to break their leg? Sounds crazy, no? But in our little world of theatre, you might say every one of us is beholden to the grand traditions of the stage, trying to sing out a pleasant, simple tune without breaking their neck. It isn’t easy. You may ask, “Why do we stay up here if it’s so dangerous?” We stay because theatre is our home. And how do we keep our traditions alive? That I can tell you in one word: superstition!

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Superstitions in the Theater

If I am ever home alone and just feeling a little lonely, I put on a scary movie and about 30 minutes later I am pretty much convinced that there is someone in the house with me. My friend’s cabin in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey has a ghost called Hazel Grunzel, the first owner of the cabin. It’s strange how we always shut more doors than any of us open! Theaters are no different; almost every theater I have worked at has a ghost or two.

Ghostly Apparitions

One of the most haunted theaters in the world is claimed to be the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in London. The current theater opened back in 1812, but there were previous theaters dating back on this site to 1663, but succumbed to fires. Audience, actors, and backstage crew have spotted The Man in Grey with his tricorne hat and riding cloak. He is often seen in the upper boxes and if he is seen it brings good luck to the show. Anyone who has worked at the New Amsterdam has seen—or seen through—Olive Thomas. At 16 she won the title of ‘Most Beautiful Girl in New York City’ and she became a Ziegfeld Girl but strangely died at 25 after taking too many mercury pills. She can be seen backstage wandering in full Follies regalia and a blue bottle in her hands. 

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16 Lesser-Known Rules Broadway Actors Have To Follow

Acting is a profession that the average person has been obsessed with for many years. There was always a level of mystique and magic surrounding the theater world, and no one can deny that actors are a unique breed of human being. What they do requires skills and confidence that not everyone is born with, which is part of the reason they are so celebrated around the world. But it didn't always use to be that way. Before the time of silent pictures, most actors were relatively unknown outside of the theater world, and they definitely weren't high earners. These days, when we think about acting, we think about prestige, fame and lots of money.

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The dance world is brimming with superstitions. One of the most common is never to say "good luck" before a show, since everyone knows uttering the phrase is, in fact, very bad luck. Actors say "break a leg" instead. But since that phrase isn't exactly dance-friendly, you and your dance friends probably tell each other "merde" before taking the stage.

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Angels and Ministers of Grace: Theatrical Superstitions Through the Ages 

If at any time you find yourself starved for attention, simply wander into the backstage area of any theater in the English-speaking world. Start to chant "Double, double, toil and trouble," or perhaps simply shout the word "Macbeth!" at the top of your lungs. You will instantly be surrounded by actors and stagehands, frantically shushing you and maybe even trying to push you out the door. Once outside, you must do several things: you must turn around three times, spit over your left shoulder, and either 1) say the filthiest word you know, 2) say "Angels and ministers of grace defend us!", or 3) speak a line from A Midsummer Night's Dream. Then you must wait to be invited back into the theater. Only then will the dread Curse of the Scottish Play be reversed.


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7 Times Someone Said ‘Macbeth’ And Things Went Wrong

One of the most well-known myths for thespians involves uttering the name “Macbeth” inside the theatre. If you are currently in a production, sitting in a theatre and for some reason reading this article out loud, please relocate.

As the legend goes, when this name is spoken inside a theatre, it can curse the production. Lights can fall, people can literally break their legs and the whole of a production may become a disaster within minutes. Once spoken, a curse reversal needs to occur, or things may just keep going terribly wrong.  

We know what some of you may be thinking: This is just a silly superstition. But just before you utter this in a theatre to prove us wrong, see if these seven stories from our Theatre Nerds about how the Scottish play nearly ruined a production will change your mind:

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St. Paul's Chapel has survived a lot of tragedies since its opening in 1766, and its graveyard, which dates to 1697, is said to be haunted by many of its occupants. One of the 17th-century graves belongs to the English actor George Frederick Cooke, who loved to gamble. When he lost all of his money, he sold his head for research, and a headless ghost has been seen wondering the graveyard and a nearby alley where there used to be a theater.

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