Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Either or


My latest work


Slapped


Enjoy


I miss Richard Brautigan


"I drank coffee
and read old books
and waited for the year to end."
Richard Brautigan



Eye candy


Here's a poem for yous

 “TITANIC”
By
DAVID R. SLAVITT’S

Who does not love the Titanic?
If they sold passage tomorrow for that same crossing,
who would not buy?
To go down…We all go down, mostly
alone. But with crowds of people, friends, servants,
well fed, with music, with lights!Ah!
And the world, shocked, mourns, as it ought to do
and almost never does. There will be the books and movies
to remind our grandchildren who we were
and how we died, and give them a good cry.
Not so bad, after all. The cold
water is anesthetic and very quick.
The cries on all sides must be a comfort.
We all go: only a few, first class.



The Stolen Child

I’ve read this poem for decades.  
Notice how you could take the first sentence of three first stanza’s (of which the first words all begin with a calming W sound and establish place) and blend them in, easily, to fit into the last paragraph.
The W sound is replayed again at the end of each stanza  (To the waters and the wild, With a faery, hand in hand) but not in a soothing sense, rather as words to excite the child about a wonderful place.

WHERE dips the rocky highland
Where the wave of moonlight glosses
Where the wandering water gushes


The Stolen Child
By Yeats

WHERE dips the rocky highland
Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,
There lies a leafy island
Where flapping herons wake
The drowsy water rats;
There we've hid our faery vats,
Full of berrys
And of reddest stolen cherries.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wave of moonlight glosses
The dim gray sands with light,
Far off by furthest Rosses
We foot it all the night,
Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight;
To and fro we leap
And chase the frothy bubbles,
While the world is full of troubles
And anxious in its sleep.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Where the wandering water gushes
From the hills above Glen-Car,
In pools among the rushes
That scarce could bathe a star,
We seek for slumbering trout
And whispering in their ears
Give them unquiet dreams;
Leaning softly out
From ferns that drop their tears
Over the young streams.
Come away, O human child!
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand.

Away with us he's going,
The solemn-eyed:
He'll hear no more the lowing
Of the calves on the warm hillside
Or the kettle on the hob
Sing peace into his breast,
Or see the brown mice bob
Round and round the oatmeal chest.
For he comes, the human child,
To the waters and the wild
With a faery, hand in hand,

For the world's more full of weeping than he can understand.