Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Texas Neighbors ‘Pay It Forward’ After Cashier’s Act Of Kindness



Robbie Owens
FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – What is the cost of kindness? For a North Fort Worth cashier, it  was $6.
“So, I’m walking up to pay for my goods,” recalls customer Karridy Askenasy, “and he’s apologizing, ‘I’m so sorry, sir, this lady’s running out to her car to get some money .’ I looked outside, and I’m like: ‘the lady that’s driving away?'”
Askenasy, who was at the store to pick up a prescription, says the cashier, later identified as Christian Griffan, looked disappointed for barely a moment, before reaching into his wallet.
Initially discouraging the cashier Askenasy said, “I’m like ‘you’re gonna pay for that? You shouldn’t pay for it… you’ve got cameras, get her plates and get her back here to pay for it!’ And he was like, ‘nah, she had formula.’”
Enough said.
Askenasy was so impressed with the young man’s compassion that he shared his story on NextDoor, a neighborhood social media  site and Facebook. And you can guess what happened next. Forget the prescription—the kindness was contagious! The story has been shared hundreds of times and garnered several thousand likes.
Neighbors began showing up to reimburse him the cost of the baby formula—but, others, familiar with the friendly clerk, wanted to do even more. “Before I knew it, I had $200 and people coming to me to give me money,” says Askenasy. “What’s so cool is that I didn’t solicit it. I just wanted to give neighbors an opportunity to recognize this young man.”
So easy going cashier Christian Griffan was in for a surprise—the next gift card he rang up wouldn’t be going very far. “I slid it back to him and said ‘no, that’s yours—that’s from your neighbors, we appreciate you.’”
Needless to say, he was stunned… telling Askenasy, “Are you for real? No man, really?”
Paying it forward, was pure pleasure. “It took me a moment to convince him that it was his,” says Askenasy, “really nice to shake his hand.”
Follow me @cbs11Robbie



Too Many People in Jail? Abolish Bail



By MAYA SCHENWARMAY 8, 2015

CHICAGO — HOW can we reduce the enormous populations of our country’s local jails?
Last month, Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York unveiled a plan to decrease the population of the Rikers Island jail complex by reducing the backlog of cases in state courts. About 85 percent of those at Rikers haven’t been convicted of any offense; they’re just awaiting trial, sometimes for as long as hundreds of days.
Mayor de Blasio’s plan is a positive step. Yet it ignores a deeper question: Why are so many people — particularly poor people of color — in jail awaiting trial in the first place?
Usually, it is because they cannot afford bail. According to a 2011 report by the city’s Independent Budget Office, 79 percent of pretrial detainees were sent to Rikers because they couldn’t post bail right away.
This is a national problem. Across the United States, most of the people incarcerated in local jails have not been convicted of a crime but are awaiting trial. And most of those are waiting in jail not because of any specific risk they have been deemed to pose, but because they can’t pay their bail.
In other words, we are locking people up for being poor. This is unjust. We should abolish monetary bail outright.
Some will argue that bail is necessary to prevent flight before trial, but there is no good basis for that assumption. For one thing, people considered to pose an unacceptable risk of flight (or violence) are not granted bail in the first place. (Though the procedures for determining who poses a risk themselves ought to be viewed with skepticism, especially since conceptions of risk are often shaped, tacitly or otherwise, by racist assumptions.)
There is also evidence that bail is not necessary to ensure that people show up for trial. In Washington, D.C., a city that makes virtually no use of monetary bail, the vast majority of arrestees who are released pretrial do return to court, and rates of additional crime before trial are low.
In addition to being unjust and unnecessary, pretrial incarceration can have harmful consequences. Not only do those who are in jail before trial suffer the trauma of confinement, but in comparison with their bailed-out counterparts, they are also more likely to be convicted at trial. As documented in a 2010 Human Rights Watch report, the legal system is substantially tougher to navigate from behind bars. People in jail face more pressure to accept plea bargains — often, ones that aren’t to their advantage — than do those confronting their charges from home.
Those who spend even a few days in jail can lose their jobs or housing during that time. Single parents can lose custody of their children. By exacerbating the effects of poverty, and by placing people in often traumatizing circumstances, pretrial incarceration may actually lead to more crime.
Bail also raises issues of racial injustice. A number of studies have shown that black defendants are assigned higher bail amounts than their white counterparts. This discrepancy is compounded by the fact that black people disproportionately live in poverty and thus unduly face challenges in paying bail.
Other burdens of bail also fall harder on people of color. For instance, black mothers face a particularly serious risk of losing custody of their children while incarcerated, because they are excessively targeted by child protective services.
Jails disproportionately confine mentally ill people, too — rates of mental illness are four to six times higher in jail than outside — and people with mental health problems often live in economic circumstances that make it difficult to afford bail. A study released in February by the Vera Institute of Justice found that one-third of jailed people with mental illness were unemployed before being arrested.
Finally, monetary bail is at odds with the legal ideal of the presumption of innocence. If we want to grant people this presumption, we must not punish them before their trials.
There is no getting around it: We are incarcerating people for being poor, at great cost to actual human lives. We have to stop.


Maya Schenwar, the editor in chief of Truthout, is the author of “Locked Down, Locked Out: Why Prison Doesn’t Work and How We Can Do Better.”



The LLR: One book

The LLR: One book: No two persons ever read the same book . - Edmund Wilson  Elaine de Kooning, “Frank O’Hara” (1962)

Good words to have and use

Futilitarian 1. Devoted to futile pursuits. 2. Holding the belief that human striving is useless.

noun:
1. A person devoted to futile pursuits.
2. One who believes that human striving is useless.
A blend of futile and utilitarian. Earliest documented use: 1827.




An Atlas of Upward Mobility Shows Paths Out of Poverty


New York Times

Income in adulthood for children whose families moved to a better place

By David Leonhardt, Amanda Cox and Claire Cain Miller

In the wake of the Los Angeles riots more than 20 years ago, Congress created an anti-poverty experiment called Moving to Opportunity. It gave vouchers to help poor families move to better neighborhoods and awarded them on a random basis, so researchers could study the effects.
The results were deeply disappointing. Parents who received the vouchers did not seem to earn more in later years than otherwise similar adults, and children did not seem to do better in school. The program’s apparent failure has haunted social scientists and policy makers, making poverty seem all the more intractable.
Now, however, a large new study is about to overturn the findings of Moving to Opportunity. Based on the earnings records of millions of families that moved with children, it finds that poor children who grow up in some cities and towns have sharply better odds of escaping poverty than similar poor children elsewhere.
The feelings heard across Baltimore’s recent protests — of being trapped in poverty — seem to be backed up by the new data. Among the nation’s 100 largest counties, the one where children face the worst odds of escaping poverty is the city of Baltimore, the study found.
The city is especially harsh for boys: Low-income boys who grew up there in recent decades make roughly 25 percent less as adults than similar low-income boys who were born in the city and moved as small children to an average place.
Beyond Baltimore, economists say the study offers perhaps the most detailed portrait yet of upward mobility — and the lack of it. The findings suggest that geography does not merely separate rich from poor but also plays a large role in determining which poor children achieve the so-called American dream.
How neighborhoods affect children “has been a quandary with which social science has been grappling for decades,” said David B. Grusky, director of the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Stanford University, who was not involved in the research. “This delivers the most compelling evidence yet that neighborhoods matter in a really big way.”
Raj Chetty, one of the study’s authors, has presented the findings to members of the Obama administration, as well as to Hillary Rodham Clinton and Jeb Bush, both of whom have signaled that mobility will be central themes of their 2016 presidential campaigns. After more than 15 years of mostly mediocre economic growth and rising income inequality, many families say they are frustrated and anxious about trying to get ahead.
“The data shows we can do something about upward mobility,” said Mr. Chetty, a Harvard professor, who conducted the main study along with Nathaniel Hendren, also a Harvard economist. “Every extra year of childhood spent in a better neighborhood seems to matter.”
The places where poor children face the worst odds include some — but not all — of the nation’s largest urban areas, like Atlanta; Chicago; Los Angeles; Milwaukee; Orlando, West Palm Beach and Tampa in Florida; Austin, Tex.; the Bronx; and the parts of Manhattan with low-income neighborhoods.
All else equal, low-income boys who grow up in such areas earn about 35 percent less on average than otherwise similar low-income children who grow up in the best areas for mobility. For girls, the gap is closer to 25 percent.
The former home of the Polk family in Bellwood, Ill.  The fatal shooting of Latonya Polk's husband there prompted her to move away with her two children in search of a safer place. Credit Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times
Many of these places have large African-American populations, and the findings suggest that race plays an enormous but complex role in upward mobility. The nation’s legacy of racial inequality appears to affect all low-income children who live in heavily black areas: Both black and white children seem to have longer odds of reaching the middle class, and both seem to benefit from moving to better neighborhoods.
The places most conducive to upward mobility include large cities — San Francisco, San Diego, Salt Lake City, Las Vegas and Providence, R.I. — and major suburban counties, such as Fairfax, Va.; Bergen, N.J.; Bucks, Pa.; Macomb, Mich.; Worcester, Mass.; and Contra Costa, Calif.
These places tend to share several traits, Mr. Hendren said. They have elementary schools with higher test scores, a higher share of two-parent families, greater levels of involvement in civic and religious groups and more residential integration of affluent, middle-class and poor families.
For low-income families, a home in places with these characteristics is often a financial stretch. Rachelle Hawkins, a 32-year-old single mother in California, rented an apartment in Contra Costa late last year after moving from a gritty neighborhood near Oakland and being homeless for a time. She makes about $29,000 as a customer-service agent in online banking and faces an annual rent bill of almost $17,000.
But she thinks the burden is worth it for her children, who are 4 and 6. “I don’t think my kids are going to remember what we went through,” Ms. Hawkins said. “They are absolutely better off, just because of the environment.”
In addition to studying the outcomes of more than five million children who moved, Mr. Chetty and Mr. Hendren also revisited the subjects of the Moving to Opportunity experiment. Working with Lawrence Katz, one of the original researchers to study the program, they analyzed more recent, richer data — and concluded that children who moved before they were teenagers did indeed benefit economically. (The original study had found health benefits for both younger and older children.)
The Polk family's new apartment, in Wood Dale, Ill., is small, but Mrs. Polk and her two teenage children are pleased with the calmer setting. Credit Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times
In both studies, the younger children were when they moved, the better they did. Children were less likely to become single parents when they grew up, were more likely to go to college and to earn more. The original research had not been able to follow the economic outcomes of younger children, because not enough time had passed, Mr. Katz said.
Still, the more extensive nationwide data on moving found that older children were also affected by their neighborhood. The effect was what statisticians call linear: Each additional year in a different place had roughly the same average effect on a child’s adult earnings. A teenager’s year in a better neighborhood mattered as much as a 9-year-old’s year — but 9-year olds still had their teenage years in front of them.
Some economists who have seen the new study say that it argues for a new approach to housing policy. Current policy often forces the parents of young children onto waiting lists for housing vouchers. It also gives tax incentives to developers who build in poor neighborhoods, rather than rewarding those who build affordable housing in areas that seem to offer better environments.
In an interview Friday, Julián Castro, the secretary of Housing and Urban Development, said he was excited by the new data. Mr. Castro said his department had been planning to reallocate funding, so that some people moving to more expensive neighborhoods would receive larger vouchers. Currently, the value of vouchers tends to be constant across a metropolitan area.
The large county on the other end of the spectrum from Baltimore, with the best odds of escaping poverty, is DuPage County, Ill., west of Chicago. It contains suburbs where the schools are considered better and where housing costs more than in Chicago and some close-in suburbs.
In 2012, Latonya Polk decided to move there with her son and daughter, then 16 and 15. Her husband had been fatally shot on the front lawn of their apartment outside Chicago in 2011, in a crime that remains unsolved, she said.
Briana, her daughter, was hesitant about leaving her friends, but Mrs. Polk insisted, saying they could still visit them. “I knew absolutely it would mean better possibilities for my kids,” she said.
Mrs. Polk, center, with her son Jovan Nicholson and daughter Briana Nicholson at home in Wood Dale. Credit Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times
Mrs. Polk earns about $40,000 a year at a company that helps clear goods through customs. She has been able to afford the move by living in a cramped $1,025-a-month, one-bedroom apartment — and with help from a county program that gives them about $2,000 a year toward living expenses.
Her son, Jovan, graduated from high school last year and is now working, while Briana will graduate this spring. Both plan to enroll in community college in the next year.
Although most places with better odds of escaping poverty have higher rent, the researchers did identify some counties as “upward-mobility bargains.” These include Putnam County, N.Y.; parts of the Pittsburgh and Altoona areas in Pennsylvania; and, if only relative to surrounding areas, Contra Costa.
The main innovation of the new paper — part of the Equality of Opportunity Project, involving multiple researchers — is its focus on children who moved. Doing so allows the economists to ask whether the places themselves actually affect outcomes. The alternative is that, say, Baltimore happens to be home to a large number of children who would struggle no matter where they grew up.
The data suggests otherwise. The easiest way to understand the pattern may be the different effects on siblings, who have so much in common. Younger siblings who moved from a bad area to a better one earned more as adults than their older siblings who were part of the same move. The particular environment of a city really does seem to affect its residents.
The data does not answer the question of whether the factors that distinguish higher-mobility places, like better schools and less economic segregation, are causing the differences — or are themselves knock-on effects of other, underlying causes. “We still need clarity on that,” Mr. Grusky, the Stanford professor, said.
From her perspective, Ms. Hawkins, the Contra Costa resident, said that the mixing of people from different social classes did make a difference.
“It’s all spread out here,” she said. In her old home near Oakland, entire neighborhoods had high unemployment and crime, which led people who did have jobs to flee, causing a downward spiral. “You don’t want to put your kid in harm’s way. That’s just extra stress.”
For all the benefits that moves can bring, they are not a solution to poverty, said people who have seen the new paper as well as the researchers themselves. Finding ways to improve those neighborhoods, for people who cannot or do not want to move, is also important, researchers and policy makers said.
“We can’t walk away from them,” Mr. Castro, the housing secretary, said. “We need a two-pronged approach.”
David Leonhardt reported from Washington, Amanda Cox from New York, and Claire Cain Miller from San Francisco. Dave McKinney contributed reporting from Wood Dale, Ill.
The Upshot provides news, analysis and graphics about politics, policy and everyday life. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

A version of this article appears in print on May 4, 2015, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Change of Address Offers a Pathway Out of Poverty






POSITIVE WORDS

LIST OF POSITIVE WORDS
 Find below currently 1,109 positive words!



Positive Words starting with letter A
ABLE,   ACCEPT – ACCEPTANCE – ACCEPTABLE – ACCEPTED – ACCEPTING,   ACTION,   ACTIVATE,   ACTIVE,   ADD,   ADDITION,   ADMIRABLE,   ADORABLE,   ADVANTAGE,   AFFIRM,   AGELESS,   AGREE,   AGREEABLE,   AID,   AIM,   ABUNDANCE,   ACCOUNTABILITY,   ACCOMPLISHMENT – ACCOMPLISH,   ACCURACY,   ACHIEVEMENT – ACHIEVE,   ACKNOWLEDGEMENT,   ADAPTABILITY,   ADVENTURE – ADVENTUROUS,   AGILITY,   ALERTNESS,   AMBITION,   ANTICIPATION,    APPRECIATE – APPRECIATION – APPRECIATIVE – APPRECIATIVENESS,   ASSERTIVENESS – ASSERTIVE,   ATTENTIVENESS,   AUDACITY,   AWARE – AWARENESS,   AUTHENTIC – AUTHENTICITY,   ABRACADABRA,   ATTRACTION,   ALLOW – ALLOWING,   AFFECTION – AFFECTIONATE,   ABSORBED,   ALERT,   AMAZED,   AWE – AWED,   ANIMATE – ANIMATED – ANIMATING – ANIMATION – ANIMATENESS,   ARDENT,   AMAZING,   AWESOME – AWESOMENESS,   AROUSED,   ASTONISHED – ASTONISHING,   AMUSED,   AIR – AIRNESS,   ALOHA,   ADORE,    ADMIRE,   ADMIRABLE,   ALLURE,    ANGEL – ANGELIC,    ALTRUISM – ALTRUISTIC,   ABOUNDING,   ABSOLUTE – ABSOLUTELY, ACCESSIBLE,   ACCLAIMED,   ACCOMMODATE – ACCOMMODATED – ACCOMMODATION – ACCOMMODATING,    AMPLE,   APPRECIATIVE JOY,   AMIN,   ACCENTUACTIVITY,   ACTABILITY,   AFFABLE,   ALACRITY,   ALTRUCAUSE,   AMIABLE, ASTOUNDING, ATTRACTIVE,ALIVE – ALIVENESS


Positive Words starting with letter B
BEATIFY,   BEATITUDE,   BENEFICIAL,   BENEFIT,   BENEVOLENT,   BELOVED,   BEST,   BETTER,   BLESS – BLESSING – BLESSED,   BLISS – BLISSFULNESS – BLISSFUL,   BLOOM,   BLOSSOM,   BALANCE – BALANCED,   BEAUTY – BEAUTIFUL,   BELONG – BELONGING,   BOLDNESS,   BRAVERY,   BRILLIANCE – BRILLIANT,   BLISS ON TAP,   BEYOND FABULOUS,   BIOPHILIA,   BRIGHT,   BRIGHTNESS, BALISTIC, BLASTING, BLAZING, BLINDING, BREATHTAKING, BUBBLING, BUSTING, BLISSCIPLINE, BUYANCY, BULLISHNESS, BRISKNESS, BUOYANCY, BREEZINESS, BRIO


Positive Words starting with letter C
CARE – CARING,   CALM,   CREATE,   CREATIVE – CREATIVITY – CREATIVENESS ,   CAPABLE – CAPABILITY,   CELEBRATE – CELEBRATION,   CERTAIN – CERTAINTY,   CHARITABLE – CHARITY,   CHARM – CHARMING – CHARMER,   CHOICE,   CLEAN – CLEANLINESS,   COMFORT – COMFORTABLE – COMFORTING,   CALM,   CUDDLE – CUDDLING,   CANDOR,   CAREFULNESS,   CHALLENGE,   CHANGE,   CHEERFUL – CHEERFULNESS,   CLARITY,   COLLABORATION,   COMMITMENT,   COMMUNICATION,   COMMUNITY,   COMPASSION – COMPASSIONATE,   COMPETENT – COMPETENCE – COMPETENCY,   CONCENTRATION,   CONFIDENT – CONFIDENCE,   CONSCIOUSNESS,   CONSISTENCY – CONSISTENT,   CONTENT – CONTENTMENT,   CONTINUITY – CONTINUOUS,   CONTRIBUTION,   CONVICTION – CONVINCING,   COOPERATION,   COURAGE,   COURTESY – COURTEOUS,    CURIOUS – CURIOSITY,   CHAKRA,   COOL,   CLEAR HEADED,   CENTERED,   CLOSENESS,   COMPANIONSHIP,   CONSIDERATE – CONSIDERATION,   COMMUNION,   CONNECT – CONNECTED – CONNECTION – CONNECTEDNESS,   CONQUER,   CUTE,   CHARISMA – CHARISMATIC,   COLLECTED,   CHEERFUL WILLINGNESS,   CHEERS,   CONGRUENCE,   CORDIAL,   CRANK (UP), CAPITAL, CORKING


Positive Words starting with letter D
DIRECTION,   DELICATE,   DECENT,   DESIRABLE,   DELICIOUS – DELICIOUSNESS,   DO,   DREAM – DREAMY,   DYNAMIC,   DARING,   DECISIVENESS,   DELIGHT – DELIGHTED – DELIGHTFUL,   DEPENDABILITY,   DESIRE,   DETERMINATION,   DEVOTION,   DIGNITY,   DILIGENCE,   DISCIPLINE,   DISCOVERY,   DISCRETION,   DIVERSITY,   DRIVE,   DUTY,   DIVINE,   DAZZLED,   DISNEY,   DEVOTED,   DANDY,   DAIMON,   DEBONAIR,   DETACHMENT

Positive Words starting with letter E
EMPATHY – EMPATHIZE – EMPHATIC,   EASY – EASILY,   EDUCATE – EDUCATION – EDUCATED,   EFFICIENT,   ENABLE – ENABLED,   ENERGETIC – ENERGIZE – ENERGY,   ENGAGE – ENGAGING – ENGAGED,   ENJOY – ENJOYMENT,   ENOUGH,   EAGER – EAGERNESS,   EFFECTIVENESS,   EFFICIENCY,   ELATION,   ELEGANCE,   ENCOURAGE – ENCOURAGEMENT – ENCOURAGED,   ENDURANCE,   EQUALITY,   EXCELLENCE – EXCELLENT,   EXCITE – EXCITEMENT – EXCITED,   EXPERIENCE,   EXPERTISE,   EXPLORATION,   EXPRESSIVENESS – EXPRESSING,   ENLIGHTENMENT,   ETERNAL,   EXALTATION,   EMULATE,   EMPOWER – EMPOWERING – EMPOWERED,   EXPANSIVE,   EXHILARATING,   ENTHUSIASTIC – ENTHUSIASM,   ENGROSSED,   ENCHANTED,   ENTRANCED,   ECSTATIC,   ELATED,   ENTHRALLED,   EXUBERANT – EXUBERANCE,   EXPECTANT,   EQUANIMOUS,   ENLIVENED,   EFFICACY,   EASE,   EXEMPLARY,   EXTRAORDINARY,   EARNEST,   ELEVATE – ELEVATED,   EQUANIMITY,   EASE-OF-MIND,   EXCITED ANTICIPATION,   EXTRA,   EQUITY – EQUITABLY – EQUITABLE,   EASY TO TALK TO,   EASY TO APPROACH,   ECSTATIFY,      EUDAEMONISM,   EUDAEMONIST,   EUDAEMONISTIC,   EUDAIMONIA,   EUDAMONIA,   EVOLVE,   EXALTING,   EXSTATISFY,   EXULTANT, ASTRONOMICAL, CHAMPION, CHAMP’, ELECTRIC, ENORMOUS , EXCEPTIONAL, EXCITING, EXQUISITE,   EFFORTLESSNESS, EUNOIA,  ECOSOPHY, EBULLIENCE


Positive Words starting with letter F
FANTASTIC,   FEEL GOOD – FEELING GOOD,   FLOW – FLOWING,   FABULOUS,   FAIR,   FAITH,   FAITHFUL,   FAME,   FAVORITE,   FAIRNESS,   FAMILY,   FIDELITY,   FLEXIBILITY,   FOCUS,   FLOURISH,   FORGIVE – FORGIVING – FORGIVENESS,   FORTITUDE,   FREE – FREEDOM,     FRUGALITY,   FUN,   FUTURE,   FRIEND – FRIENDLY – FRIENDSHIP – FRIENDLINESS,   FASCINATE – FASCINATED,   FULFILL – FULFILLED,   FOOD,   FEISTY – FEISTINESS,   FESTIVE,   FEASIBLE,   FINE,   FEARLESS,  FESTIVE – FESTIVENESS,   FIT, FANTABULOUS, FREECYCLE, FUNERIFIC, FUNOLOGY, FLAWLESS


Positive Words starting with letter G
GLOW,  GENEROUS – GENEROSITY,   GENERATE,   GENIAL,   GENIUS,   GENUINE,   GIFT,   GIVE – GIVING,   GOOD,   GOODNESS,   GIVING,   GOING THE EXTRA MILE,   GRACE,   GRATITUDE – GRATEFULNESS,   GROW – GROWTH,   GUIDE – GUIDING – GUIDANCE,   GOD,   GROUNDED,   GLORY,   GODLINESS,   GOOD-FEELING,   GROOVY,   GIDDY,   GLAD,   GOOD HEALTH,   GLAMOR,   GIGGLING,   GODDESS,   GORGEOUS – GORGEOUSNESS,   GRANDIOSITY, GENERAVITY, GENTLEMAN, GARGANTUAN, GRAND, GREAT, GINGER


Positive Words starting with letter H
HOPE – HOPEFULNESS,   HAPPINESS – HAPPY – HAPPILY,   HARMONIOUS – HARMONIZE – HARMONY,   HEALTH – HEALTHY,   HEART,   HELLO,   HELP – HELPFUL – HELPING,   HOT – HONEST – HONESTY,   HUMAN,   HUMOR,   HELPFULNESS,   HERO – HEROISM,   HOLY – HOLINESS,   HONESTY,   HONOR,   HOSPITALITY,   HUMBLE,  HEAVEN – HEAVENLY,   HALO,   HEARTFELT,   HEARTWARMING,   ONE-POINTEDNESS,   HAPPY HEARTED, HEEDFUL, HANDSOME, HUGE, HIGH-SPIRITEDNESS


Positive Words starting with letter I
IMAGINATION,   INSPIRE – INSPIRATION – INSPIRED – INSPIRATIONAL,   IN-LOVE,   IDEA,   INCREDIBLE,   INNOVATE – INNOVATION,   INTERESTING – INTEREST – INTERESTED,   IMPROVEMENT,   INDEPENDENCE,   INFLUENCE,   INGENUITY,   INNER PEACE,   INSIGHT – INSIGHTFULNESS – INSIGHTFUL,   INTEGRITY,   INTELLIGENCE – INTELLIGENT,   INTENSITY,   INTIMACY,   INTUITIVENESS,   INVENTIVENESS,   INVESTING,   INTENTION,   INVIGORATE – INVIGORATED,   INTRIGUED,   INVOLVE – INVOLVED,   INCLUSION,   INNOCENT,   INEFFABLE,   INTREPID, IDEALISM, ILLUMINATION – ILLUMINATED, INCOMPARABLE, INVINCIBLE,   INQUISITIVE,   INFINITE,   INFINITY

Positive Words starting with letter J
JOY – JOYFUL – JOYOUS,   JOKE,   JOLLY,   JOVIAL,   JUST,   JUSTICE,   JUBILANT,   JUVENESCENT,   JUMPY,   JAMMIN’,    JUBILINGO


Positive Words starting with letter K
KINDNESS – KIND – KIND-HEART – KINDLY,   KEEP-UP,   KISS,   KNOWLEDGE,   KITTENS,   KEEN


Positive Words starting with letter L
LIKE,   LAUGH – LAUGHING,   LEARN – LEARNING,   LIFE,   LIVE – LIVING,   LUXURY,   LONGEVITY,   LOYALTY – LOYAL,   LOVE – LOVABLE – LOVING,   LIBERTY,   LOGIC,   LEADER – LEADERSHIP,   LUCK – LUCKY,   LIGHT,   LOVING-KINDNESS,   LIVELY,    LIFE OF THE PARTY,   LOVELY,   LOVING ACCEPTANCE,   LOVING FEELINGS, LIGHTWORKER

ositive Words starting with letter M
MEANING – MEANINGFUL,   MORE,   MAGNIFICENT,   MAJESTY,   MANY,   MARVELOUS,   MERIT,   MOTIVATE,   MIRACLE,   MAGIC,   MAKING A DIFFERENCE,   MASTERY,   MATURITY,   MEANING, MERIT,   MINDFUL – MINDFULNESS,   MODESTY,   MOTIVATION – MOTIVATIONAL,   MERCY,   MEDITATION,   MIND-BLOWING,   MELLOW,   MOVED,   MOVEMENT,   MUTUALITY,   MOURNING, MELIORISM, MENCH, MIDSIGHT, MINDSIGHT, MAJOR

Positive Words starting with letter N
NOBLE,   NURTURING – NURTURE,   NON-RESISTANCE – NON-RESISTANT,   NEW,   NICE,   NIRVANA,   NOBLE, NEAT,   NATURE-MADE,   NOURISH – NOURISHED – NOURISHING – NOURISHMENT,   NAMASTE, NEOTENY

Positive Words starting with letter O
OPTIMIST – OPTIMISTIC,   OUTSTANDING,   OK,   ON,   ONWARDS,   OPEN – OPENLY – OPENING,   OPEN-MINDED,   OPPORTUNITY,   ORIGINAL,   OPENNESS,   OPPORTUNITY,   OPTIMISM,   ORDER,   ORGANIZATION,   ORIGINALITY,   OUTCOME,   ORIENTATION,   OBEDIENT,   OPEN HEARTED,   OMG,   OVERCOME,   OM MANI PADME HUM,   OUTGOING, ONENESS, OUTERNATIONALIST

Positive Words starting with letter P
PERFECT – PERFECTION,   POSITIVE ENERGY,   POSITIVE THOUGHTS,   POSITIVE EVENTS,   POSITIVE CIRCUMSTANCES,   POSITIVE BELIEFS,   PEACE – PACIFY,   PARADISE – PARADISIAC,   PASSION – PASSIONATE,   PLEASE,   PURE,   PEACE,   PERCEPTIVENESS,   PERSEVERANCE,   PERSISTENCE,   PERSONAL GROWTH,   PLEASURE,   POSITIVE ATTITUDE,   POSITIVE WORDS,   POWER – POWERFUL,   PRACTICALITY,   PRECISION,   PREPAREDNESS,   PRESENCE,   PRESERVATION,   PRIVACY,   PROACTIVITY – PROACTIVE,   PROGRESS,   PROSPERITY PROSPEROUS,    PUNCTUALITY – PUNCTUAL,   PATIENCE,   PROUD,   PLEASED,   PRESENCE,   PLAY – PLAYFUL – PLAYFULNESS,   PARTICIPATION,   PURPOSE,   PICK-ME-UP,   PRONIA,   PIOUS,   PUPPIES,   POLITE,   POSITIVE MIND,   POSITIVE THINKING,    POSITIVE WORDS,   PRETTY,   PRECIOUS, PARDON, PERKINESS, PIQUANCY,  POSICHOICE, POSIDRIVING, POSIFIT, POSILENZ, POSIMASS, POSIMINDER, POSIRATIO, POSIRIPPLE, POSIRIPPLER, POSIRIPPLES, POSISINGER, POSISITE, POSISTRENGTH, POSITIBILITARIAN, POSITRACTION, POSITUDE, POSIVALUES, POSIWORD, POSSIBILITARIAN, PROMPTNESS, PROTO, PRICELESS, PEP – PEPPINESS

Positive Words starting with letter Q
QUALITY,   QUIET – QUIETNESS,   QUAINT,   QUIESCENT, QUEENLY, QUICKENING, QUIDDITY

Positive Words starting with letter R
RESPECT,   RADIANT,   READY – READINESS,   REAL – REALITY,   REASON,   RECOMMEND,   REFRESH – REFRESHED,   RELAX – RELAXED,   RELIEF,   RELIEVE – RELIEVED,   REMARKABLE,   RATIONALITY,   RECOGNITION,   RELATIONSHIPS,   RELIABLE – RELIABILITY,   RELIGION,   RESOURCEFULNESS,   RESPECT,   RESPONSIBILITY,   RIGHTEOUSNESS,   RISK-TAKING,   ROMANCE,   REVELATION,   REVIVED,   RESTORE – RESTORED,   REST – RESTED,   RENEW – RENEWED,   REJUVENATE – REJUVENATED,   RAPTURE – RAPTUROUS,   RESILIENT – RESILIENCE,   REVERENCE,    RIPE,   REBORN,   RELATEDNESS,   RASASVADA,   REPOSE, ROSINESS

Positive Words starting with letter S
SCOPE,   SMILE – SMILING,   SOULMATE,   SOUL – SOULFUL,   SACRED,   SAFE – SAFETY,   SECURE – SECURED – SECURITY,   SUSTAIN – SUSTAINED,   SAVE, SAVINGS,   SIMPLE – SIMPLIFY,    SELFLESSNESS,   SELF-ESTEEM,   SERVICE,   SIMPLICITY,   SINCERITY,   SKILL – SKILLED,   SPIRIT,   SERENE – SERENITY,   STABILITY,   STRENGTH,   STYLE,   SYSTEMATIZATION,   SELF-LOVE,   STRIVE,   SERVICE,   SALVATION,   SELF-RESPECT,   SELF-FORGIVENESS,   SERVE,   SYMPATHETIC,   SELF-COMPASSION,   SELF-KINDNESS,   SPELLBOUND,   STIMULATED – STIMULATING – STIMULATION,  SATISFIED,   STILL,   SURPRISED,   SLEEP,   SEXUAL EXPRESSION,   SHELTER,   SELF-EXPRESSION,   STABILITY,   SUPPORT,   SPACE – SPACIOUS, SPONTANEITY – SPONTANEOUS, SUNSHINE, SPARK – SPARKLE – SPARKLES,   SWEET – SWEETNESS,    SUPPORT – SUPPORTING – SUPPORTED,   SEXY – SEXINESS,   SUPREME,   SUCCULENT,   SWEETHEART,   STUDY – STUDIOUS,   SELFLESSNESS,    SAVOUR – SAVOURING,   SUFFICIENT,   STUPENDUOS,   SWAG – SWAGGY,   SPLENDID,   SMART,   SPECTACULAR,   SPECIAL,   SERENDIPITY,   SYNERGY, SHINE – SHINING, START, STEADFASTNESS, SUBLIME, SUNNINESS,   SWEET,   SUPERPOWER

Positive Words starting with letter T
TRUE,   TRUST – TRUSTING ,   TACT,   TEACH – TEACHABLE,   TEAM,   THANKFUL – THANK – THANK-YOU – THANKFULNESS,   THERAPY,   TIME,   TEAMWORK,   TIMELINESS,   TOLERANCE,   TRADITION,   TRANQUIL – TRANQUILITY,   TRUST,   TRUTH – TRUTHFULNESS,   TENDER,   THRILLED,   TOUCH – TOUCHED,   TICKLED,   TO MATTER,   TO KNOW,   TO BE KNOWN,   TO BE SEEN,   TRANSFORMATIVE – TRANSFORMATION – TRANSFORM,   TRIUMPH,   TEAMWORK,   THRIVE – THRIVING, TENACITY

Positive Words starting with letter U
UNIFICATION,   UNIQUE,   UPLIFT,   ULTIMATE,   UNCONDITIONAL,   UPGRADE,   USEFUL,   USER-FRIENDLY,    UNITY,   UNDERSTAND – UNDERSTANDING – UNDERSTOOD,   UNIFICATION OF MIND,    UP, UPOWER, UPSKILL

Positive Words starting with letter V
VITALITY,   VALUE – VALUES – VALUABLE,   VIRTUOUS,   VALID,   VERIFY,   VERY,   VIABLE,   VIRTUE,   VICTORY – VICTORIOUS,   VARIETY,   VULNERABILITY – VULNERABLE,   VIBRANT,   VOW,   VIM,    VIGOR, VENERATION, VOCABULEVERAGE

Positive Words starting with letter W
WORTH – WORTHY – WORTHINESS,   WEALTH,   WARM – WARMTH,   WELCOME,   WILL- WILLING – WILLINGNESS ,   WISDOM,   WISE,   WON,   WONDERFUL,   WELL-BEING,   WHOLEHEARTEDNESS,   WOW,   WONDER,   WATER,   WELL,   WELLNESS,   WELFARE,    WHOLE,   WONDER-WORKING,   WIN – WINNABLE – WINNING

Positive Words starting with letter X
XO,   X-RAY VISION,   XENOPHILIA,    XENODOCIAL,   Xfactor,  XENOPHILE,   XENIAL

Positive Words starting with letter Y
YES,   YOUTH – YOUTHFUL,   YOUNG,   YOUNG- AT-HEART,   YIPPEE,   YAY,   YEARN,   YEA,   YEAH,   YUMMY,   YEN,    YESABILITY,    YUGEN
Positive Words starting with letter Z
ZEALOUS,    ZEAL,    ZEST – ZESTY – ZESTFUL,   ZIPPY,   ZING,   ZAPPY,   ZANY





My ancestor "Padrick "Punchy Paddy" Tuohy


                                                                               (its me)

Universal Basic Income

Green Party of England and Wales Includes Basic Income in Election Manifesto and Releases Costing Scheme

Josh Martin
The Green Party of England and Wales received plenty of press over the past few months about their support of a basic income. While questions arose about whether they would keep basic income in their manifesto, they ultimately decided to keep it in their plans. Preparing for the general election on May 7th, the Green Party released their election manifesto and included a commitment to a basic income. Under the social security section of the manifesto, basic income is the first policy mentioned as the long-term plan of the Green Party, and it is included on the one-page executive summary at the front of the manifesto.
However, the Green Party admits that implementing a basic income in five years may be impractical and thus plans to conduct consultations and research on the basic income idea during a first parliament with the aim of implementation in a second parliament.
The Green Party released a basic income costing scheme alongside the manifesto, seeking to answer the major questions about funding a basic income in the UK.
The basic income rates they propose are the following: Child Benefit increased to £50 per week for all children, £80 per week for all citizens aged 18 to pension age, and a Citizen’s Pension rate of £155 per week for pensioners. They also add supplements of £80 per week for single parents and £25 per week for single pensioners. In total, this will cost £331 billion.
To fund this, the basic income replaces most means-tested benefits, totaling £163.767 billion, but notably keeps Housing Benefit and disability-related benefits. To fund the rest of the cost, the Green Party proposes abolishing personal income tax allowances, removing the primary and secondary thresholds for National Insurance contributions (NICs), eliminating Child and Working Tax Credits, and removing about 44% of the total of tax and National Insurance relief on pension contributions. These measures, partnered with savings on administration costs reach the desired £331 billion.
This basic income system essentially introduces a 32% taper rate (20% from income tax and 12% from NICs) on earned income under £31,785, at which point the income tax level would rise, moving the taper rate up to 52%. Further, a person under this system will need to earn about £13,000 before they pay more in tax and NICs than they receive in basic income. Comparing Universal Credit to this basic income scheme, people earning under £41,000 will gain from the switch to a basic income, equivalent to about four-fifths of taxpayers.
To learn more, check out the following links:
Green Party of England and Wales, “For the Common Good: General Election Manifesto 2015”, April 2015.
Green Party of England and Wales, “Basic Income: a detailed proposal”, Consultation Paper, April 2015.




WANT TO END SLAVERY? INTRODUCE AN UNCONDITIONAL BASIC INCOME
by Neil Howard

Last May, I argued in a piece for Al-Jazeera that the emerging global anti-slavery movement risks becoming no more than a fig leaf for structural political-economic injustice.
I suggested that unless it faces that injustice head-on, it will waste a generational opportunity to make the world more just, focusing instead on making consumers and activists “feel better about feeling bad.”
It doesn’t have to be this way. There is an alternative, and it starts with advocating for unconditional basic income as a genuine anti-slavery strategy.

Only a universal basic income will truly eliminate the economic vulnerability that lies at the root of all labour exploitation.
Slavery, like trafficking and forced labour, is primarily a market phenomenon.
Although often depicted as outside of market relations, the reality is that markets create both supplies of vulnerable workers and demand for their labour.
When a worker finds herself in conditions of extreme exploitation, it is almost always the result of her economic vulnerability coinciding with an employer’s demand for her labour.
This happens because, in market societies, the freedom to refuse any job is the flip-side of the freedom to starve unless you accept one.
Unless you are independently wealthy, you have to work to survive.
For the very poor, where margins are matters of life and death, the price of saying no to even an awful employer is often too high to pay.
This is why ‘market-friendly’ policies will never be enough to abolish ‘modern-day slavery’.
Market-friendly policies do not fundamentally alter the balance of power between the economically weak and the economically strong.
They rely on either goodwill or police enforcement, persuading employers to ‘behave better’, consumers to shop more ethically, and police forces to root out bad apples.
But these policies do nothing about the economic compulsion that renders the poorest vulnerable to malevolent employers adept at evading the authorities.

Basic income
So what is to be done? The one single policy that has most emancipatory potential is the unconditional basic income (UBI).
UBI has a long and respected pedigree.
Thomas Paine advocated a version of it at the dawn of the American Revolution, and it has had modern supporters ranging from Bertrand Russell to John Rawls.
The idea is as simple as it is brilliant: give every citizen an amount of money sufficient to guarantee their survival without any strings attached.
You receive it just by virtue of being a citizen. It will never make you rich, but it will always prevent you from going hungry, or from having to sell yourself into slavery-like labour for want of a better alternative.
When people are first pitched UBI, often, their gut reaction is to ask: “Is this feasible?”
“Won’t everybody just stop working?” These concerns are understandable, but they are also misplaced.
With regards to feasibility, there are two major points.
The first is that economic viability of such a method of wealth redistribution has already been proved in principle in the United Kingdom. Indeed, the welfare state operates on the very same basis, taxing progressively to distribute wealth more evenly.
Second, UBI is likely to be far cheaper and more efficient than any other existing system of social protection.
Currently, governments everywhere waste billions of dollars on policies that fail to reach the most vulnerable.
In the West, expensive means-testing excludes many of those most in need, while governments subsidise poverty wages and give tax breaks to corporations.
In the Global South, fuel and agricultural subsidies frequently fail to reach their intended targets as corrupt bureaucrats siphon money to buy political influence.
Under these circumstances, the costs of distributing a basic income directly to people will be offset by reducing other, less efficient programmes and cutting out the dead weight of political middle-men.
Will people work if they receive a UBI? Of course they will.
Very few are satisfied with simple subsistence; almost everyone wants to improve at least the lives of their children.
No advocate of basic income wants it set high enough to discourage work. Rather, the goal is to give people the real freedom to say “no” to bad jobs and “yes” to good ones.
Remember that in the West, it is the punitive social security system which itself creates unemployment traps.
If instead of tax-breaks or top-ups we gave people UBI, then nobody would ever face the choice of losing money by accepting work.

Empirical evidence
UBI has benefits beyond these practical fundamentals, and for the first time in history, we now have detailed empirical evidence from a developing country to show it.
Unicef recently completed a pilot project with the Self-Employed Women’s Association (SEWA) in India to trial UBI amongst thousands of villagers in the state of Madhya Pradesh. The findings are electric.
First, they show an increase in economic activity, with new small-scale businesses springing up, more work being performed, and more equipment and livestock being purchased for the local economy.
Second, those receiving UBI registered improvements in child nutrition, school attendance and performance, health and healthcare, sanitation and housing.
Greater benefits were recorded for women than for men (as women’s financial and social autonomy were increased), for the disabled than for others, and for the poorest vis-à-vis the wealthy.
But there is a third dimension that should really make the anti-slavery movement sit up and take note.
This is the ‘emancipatory dimension’. The economic security provided by UBI not only increased the political participation of the poor, as it gave them the time and resources necessary to represent their interests against the powerful.
It also freed them from the clutches of moneylenders. As Professor Guy Standing, author of the Unicef study, puts it:
“Money is a scarce commodity in Indian villages and this drives up the price.
Moneylenders and landlords can easily put villagers into debt bondage and charge exorbitant rates of interest that families cannot hope to pay off.”
Unless, of course, they benefit from UBI, in which case they have the liquidity necessary to maintain their freedom even in the case of economic shocks. If you doubt the transformative potential of this work, just watch this 12-minute video and I defy you not to be inspired.
The contemporary anti-slavery movement stands at the forefront of a critical historical juncture.
In the context of global economic crisis, the old social models are breaking down but the new are not yet ready to be born.
Into this vacuum we’ve seen the rise of serious labour exploitation, along with political and consumer activism in response.
At the vanguard of this response stand the modern abolitionists, and they do so with unrivalled discursive power.
Nobody that has a place at the table is for slavery: everybody is against it. This is why abolitionists’ call to end ‘modern-day slavery’ within a generation goes entirely unopposed.
It garners allies ranging from the global business elite to the Pope himself. More than 50,000 people a week sign up to Walk Free campaigns, and over the past several years we have witnessed a tidal-wave of pressure to crack down on extreme exploitation.
So what does all this mean? It means that today’s abolitionists stand on the verge of a once-in-a-century opportunity.
They can play it safe and advocate the market-friendly policies that will—at best—tidy up around the edges.
Or they can go big, they can go revolutionary, and they can organise a global shift in the direction of social justice.
Let us be clear: UBI is not merely the most effective tool for abolishing modern-day slavery. It is a tool for radical social justice, for changing the economic game entirely, by emancipating all of us from economic vulnerability.
If modern abolitionists have a historic mission, it is to complete the task of their predecessors: they must make freedom not just legal, but feasible.


This article was first published on OpenDemocracy’s Beyond Trafficking and Slavery section.