Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***




The UC San Diego’s Department of Theatre and Dance seeks from all enrolled undergraduate students submissions of previously unproduced, unpublished scripts highlighting the African-American experience in contemporary or historical terms. Adaptations from books and other forms are not allowed.
A $1000 honorarium will be awarded to the winning playwright.
A staged reading of the winning script on May 12th, 2018, in the Wagner New Play Festival attended by national theatre professionals.

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The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies and the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of Mississippi, in partnership with the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council, seek an emerging, unpublished woman playwright (transgender inclusive) for a 20 day summer residency in Oxford, Mississippi. Participation in the residency does not require the completion of a work but is designed to provide support to advance the creation, production, and presentation of theatrical works by women writers.

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IASH and the Traverse Theatre will commission a play on or inspired by any aspect of the Institute’s current interests. The stipend will be £10,000 and the recipient will have a private office and full Fellowship at IASH, and contribute to the Institute’s events, including giving at least one work-in-progress seminar during the tenure of the Fellowship.  During the period of the fellowship the playwright will receive dramaturgical support from the Traverse’s Literary Department. The recipient must be Edinburgh-based for the duration of the residency, as their regular presence at IASH is expected and they will be encouraged to play a part in the artistic life of the theatre.


*** For more information about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** PLAYS ABOUT TREASON ***

Some plays begin with a question and eventually answer it. "Treason," a new play by Sallie Bingham at the Perry Street Theater, does the opposite. It starts with a known quantity, the poet Ezra Pound, and at the end leaves you asking, "What, exactly, was the attraction of this spineless, self-indulgent weasel?"

The play, superbly acted, with an especially prize-worthy performance by Philip Pleasants as Pound, wastes no time getting down to its business, which is not Pound's poetry but his love life and his hate-filled politics. It begins in 1941 with a stark slice of a radio broadcast from Rome in which Pound, at that point well known, excoriates Jews and praises Germany. Later he is charged with treason by the United States, declared insane and committed to an institution in Washington.

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Cue for Treason (1940) is a children's historical novel written by Geoffrey Trease, and is his best-known work. The novel is set in Elizabethan England at the end of the 16th century.[1] Two young runaways become boy actors, at first on the road and later in London, where they are befriended by William Shakespeare. They become aware of a plot against Queen Elizabeth's life and attempt to prevent it.

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Energetic and impassioned, Richmond author and playwright David L. Robbins seems as if he’s enthusiastic about pretty much everything.

But he was definitely not enthusiastic when The John Marshall Foundation approached him with the possibility of writing a play about Marshall, specifically the Aaron Burr treason trial that Marshall presided over. Oh, and the foundation wanted it to be a production that would appeal to high school students, attorneys and the public at large.

Robbins acknowledged he is typically not enthralled at the notion of commissioned work — especially a scenario with so many prerequisites — but as a once-practicing attorney and admirer of Marshall, another Richmonder, he agreed to take a look. As he settled into his research, he began to see possibilities, and then it dawned on him: This would be a task perfectly suited for him.

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The Bloody Banquet[1] is an early 17th-century play, a revenge tragedy of uncertain date and authorship, attributed on its title page only to "T.D." It has attracted a substantial body of critical and scholarly commentary, chiefly for the challenging authorship problem it presents. It has been attributed to a collaboration between Thomas Dekker and Thomas Middleton.

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Tale of treason

In 1582, Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1536-98), a man of humble origins, became Japan’s taiko (prime minister) after the death of the warlord Oda Nobunaga. But the taiko in “Ehon Taikoki (Records of the Taiko),” a bunraku (traditional Japanese puppet) play written by Chikamatsu Yanagi and collaborators in 1799, refers more properly to the general Akechi Mitsuhide, (called Takechi Mitsuhide in the play), who had assassinated Nobunaga (called Oda Harunaga), his and Hideyoshi’s overlord, because of his tyrannical conduct.

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How far must each of us go to reclaim our broken democracy?

By Adam Klugman of Portland, Oregon. Adam is an activist, media strategist, playwright, and the host of "Mad as Hell in America", a show on Portland's KPOJ 620.

Here’s a question that rarely gets asked anymore: what is the role of art in politics? The tradition has been that writers, performance artists, painters and the like would interpret world events and then import them into their art - a play about El Salvador, a painting that explores the theme of poverty, a novel about government corruption, etc. For the most part, these noble, well-intended works always remain, in a word, art. That is to say, they are rarely able to break from the confines of their assigned role to become another category altogether: politics.

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Another thing you can usually count on is history repeating itself. Here we are in the 21st century with accusations of conspiracy and treason filling the country as courtroom drama plays out across cyberspace. This only makes the play more relevant, in seeing how some of the same issues plagued the country 100 years ago. According to Ken Orman, the show’s publicist, “The whole project is as epic as the story.” 

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Hot on the heels of the premiere of Tracy Letts’ “The Minutes,” a dissection of a town council meeting that dissolves into “Lord of the Flies,” comes Brett Neveu’s “Traitor,” a stimulating contemporary adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s “An Enemy of the People,” the action removed to struggling small-town Illinois, the events cataclysmic and the whole affair directed by no less than Michael Shannon, the Hollywood A-lister and two-time Oscar nominee who remains spectacularly dedicated to A Red Orchid Theatre, the ensemble-based company in Old Town where his career began.

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TREASON! is a story about the love triangle that changed the course of the American Revolution. It is a story about defining loyalty, understanding trust, misunderstanding loyalty and defining trust. It is a story about love gone wrong- big time!

Everyone knows Benedict Arnold. The dictionary, in fact, defines “traitor” as “a Benedict Arnold”. Now, through dramatic acting and sixteen original compelling and whimsical songs, this historical fiction explores the other side of the story!

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Jonathan Lynn has chosen a rich subject for a drama: the intersecting lives of Philippe Pétain and Charles de Gaulle. Covering the years from 1913 to 1945, the play shows how a father-son relationship between two professional soldiers culminated in Pétain’s trial for treason for collaborating with the Nazis. But, while the play covers a lot of ground, it seems torn between psychodrama and history lesson.

The two men, antithetical yet indissolubly linked, totally dominate the play. Pétain, who sees himself as the saviour of France through his defence of Verdun in 1916 and his armistice with the Germans in 1940, is wily, proud and pragmatic. De Gaulle, who regards himself as the embodiment of France and who placed himself at the head of the Free French forces to fight on in second world war exile, is bookish, humourless and arrogant.

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Great sentence on a dozen different levels

There is just something special about walking on snow that no one else has walked on. It makes you believe you’re special. Carol Brunt