Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Words (That's F. Scott Fitzgerald in the film below)

Pelf: noun: Money or wealth, especially when acquired in a dishonorable manner. From Old French pelfre (booty), which also gave us the word pilfer. 


Foster Care: Just another dead kid: The murder of Grace Packer

Just another dead kid: The murder of Grace Packer

By
John William Tuohy



In 2016, a 14-year-old foster girl, who was probably mentally challenged on some level,  was punched in the face by her adopted foster mother and her boyfriend, raped, bounded and ganged and left to die in a hot attic. When she didn’t die, she was strangled, had her body stored in cat litter for months, she was dismembered with a bone saw and tossed into the woods.

The child’s name was Grace, Grace Packer. She had been in the goddamned foster care system, the great disgrace of a great nation, since she was a year old. I want to write about her because I’m angry and disgusted over what happened to her and because I want you to know her name, I want you to look at her photo and see her face. I want you to know what your government, our government, allowed to happen through incompetence, and I want you to know that you have it within your power, if you speak up in defense of foster children,  to make sure something like this doesn’t happen again in a  few weeks. Because that’s how often this happens. Every couple of weeks there’s another nightmare story about a foster kid getting scalded to death with bath water or beaten to death by a foster parent and so on.
Grace’s life was as short as it was tragic. She was born on August 14, 2001, two months early and just 4 pounds, 5 ounces. She was so small her mother dressed her in dolls' clothing. Gracie’s natural mother was bipolar, and her father was intellectually challenged. Grace and two siblings were placed in foster care by age 3, due to allegations of abuse and neglect, so much so that a County judge terminated their parental rights in 2006, clearing the way for Sara and David Packer to adopt Grace in 2007.

Grace

Grace’s natural parents are still together, married for a rocky 17 years. Rose Hunsicker, Grace’s mother, has filed for protection from abuse from her husband four times since 2007, then withdrawing every petition. They have also been homeless to the point where they were living in a tent in the woods

Grace at two years old

Prior to the adoption, Gracie and her siblings were moved in and out of the county child welfare systems of eastern Pennsylvania. For a few months in 2015, Grace spent time in North Carolina, overseen by a county social services agency there.

The states report on Grace indicates that she was sexually abused in foster care over the years with incidents in 2005, June of 2010 and April of 2012  "The evaluation identified concerns that Grace may have been molested. However, it was unknown when this happened or who may have abused her"

The report also found that the teenager suffered mental, sexual and physical abuse in the years leading up to her murder and that caseworkers had opportunities to protect Grace but failed to do so.

Grace 

"It's hard not to be totally shattered on behalf of Grace that this was her life," Cathleen Palm, founder of the Center for Children's Justice, a nonprofit advocacy group in Pennsylvania, said after reviewing the findings. "It is absolutely clear that there was point after point after point that her life could have changed. It could have changed."

Packer and Sullivan

Sarah Packer, Gracie’s adopted foster mother and her murderer, lost her job at Northampton County's children and youth department in 2010 after her husband at the time, David Warren Packer, was sent to prison for sexually assaulting Grace and another foster child  who was 15 years old, between February 2007 and January 2008.

Prior to the arrest, in an unrelated case, the state Welfare Department’s regional Office of Children Youth and Families in Scranton investigated a report that David Packer physically abused Grace in 2008, three years before he pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting her, but no charges were filed.

The other abused foster daughter, now 25, said that David Packer began abusing her when she was 15, shortly after she moved into the home, and that the abuse went on for years. David packer moved the girl to a third-floor bedroom near the one he shared with Sara. He would tie her to the bedpost and leave her there all night or tie her to a chair and gag her. He dressed her in revealing outfits and made her go on a diet.

“After a while, I just gave up, mentally and physically. What was I supposed to do?” said the woman, adding she twice tried killing herself while living in the packer home and was hospitalized.

Crystal Rodack, a third former foster daughter, spent only a few months in the Packer home. But in January 2010, she said, she looked at David Packer’s phone and found photos and videos showing him sexually abusing the other foster daughter. She alerted relatives, who immediately called police.

He was arrested and charged with involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, statutory sexual assault and corruption of minors. He was released on $25,000 unsecured bail. A few weeks later, he was charged with indecent assault on a then 9-year old girl in January 2006.
 Sarah Packer was barred from taking in any more foster children. But she wasn’t charged with a crime related to her husband’s abuse, and Grace and her brother continued to live in the home. However, at that point, Packer acknowledged having sexual contact with a foster child in her care, but, despite that, child welfare authorities did not remove Grace from the home. Prosecutors say packer was aware of her husband’s sexual contact with the foster daughters and allowed it to continue anyway.

Packer’s former foster daughters said Sara Packer abused Grace and clearly favored Grace’s biological brother, whom she also adopted. Jade Tenezaca, one of the former foster children said “Her favorite child, and you could see it plain as day, had always been Gracie’s brother. She was more demanding on Gracie to be normal. But Gracie is not normal. Gracie had a learning disability. Some parts of (Grace’s) brain didn’t work like ours, and you’d have to tell her more than a few times to do things. And Sara didn’t like that. She yelled, she screamed. She hit her. She was just a big bully to her. They were really mean to Gracie in the home. She was always in trouble. They would hit her, they would ground her and take stuff from her and keep her in her room. I felt bad for her. Gracie was never in a bad mood. Gracie was always happy and fun, and she always wanted to be with the girls. She was warm. She would open her heart to anyone and everyone. If you gave her the chance, she would be your best friend.”

Jessica Rotellini Law, who was 16 when she lived with the Packers in 2006, said she told her caseworker that 6-year-old Grace was being forced to clean up dog feces, but no actions were taken to stop it.

Sullivan and Packer actually planned the rape-murder fantasy for weeks before taking Grace to a rented, vacant house in Abington, Pennsylvania, about 50 miles north of Philadelphia, where they attacked her in July 2016.

They dragged her into a stifling attic where they couldn’t be seen or heard. Before the rape began, Packer and Sullivan gave Grace what they thought was a lethal overdose of medicine, and then Sullivan raped her while Packer watched. When it was over, they bound Grace with zip ties, stuffed a ball gag in her mouth and left her for dead. When they returned after 12 hours and found that she was still alive, Sullivan strangled Grace while Packer held her hand. Then they stored the body in cat litter for several months before dismembering her remains and discarding them in a wooded area.

Packer said that murdering Gracie wasn’t part of the plan “I got wrapped up in Jake’s fantasy. I didn’t think I could tell him 'no' without losing him” and that as Sullivan choked the girl to death Packer told her it was “OK to go.”

The full plan, she said was to imprison the teen in their home so Sullivan could “rape her whenever he wanted" and that it would happen if, in her opinion, Sullivan had not panicked. “The reality of what he had done set in, and there was no going back. So, he decided that it was time for her to die,” she said.

“Grace had become” Packer later told the court “for lack of a better word, a non-entity She just didn’t exist anymore. I wanted her to go away.”  She added that when Sullivan began to rape her, Gracie called out for Packer to help her  and Packer answered “I can’t help you anymore. This is your life now.”

In July, Sara Packer reported Grace missing from their home in Montgomery County. She told the police that Grace had stolen $300 and run away. Police added Grace’s information to a missing persons database but when they wanted more information, standard information, Sara Packer was not only uncooperative, she was unusually uncooperative, refusing to return multiple calls from investigators. The cops also learned that Sara was a prolific Facebook user, “so frequent that she will sometimes post about insignificant or minor incidents in her life, such as having a migraine headache,” a charging document reads. But Sara “never posted anything about her daughter being missing.”

Grace’s corpse was actually still up in the attic in the house Packer and Sullivan lived in. All the while, Sara Packer and Sullivan continued to collect thousands of dollars in disability benefits that she received as part of caring for Grace.

In October, paranoid and certain that the police knew what they had done (They didn’t)  Packer and Sullivan dismembered Grace’s body in a downstairs bathtub and drove the parts to rural northeastern Pennsylvania where hunters discovered her remains on Halloween. The police honed in on Packer and Sullivan. The end was near, and they knew it.

In a failed suicide attempt, Sullivan overdosed himself on December 20, 2016, and was rushed to the hospital. The nurse who attended him later told the court that  “He said he didn’t know why they were coming down so hard on Sara, because he was the one who killed Grace. They couldn’t handle her anymore, but they couldn’t just return her because they needed the money. He felt like he was in a dark place and always wanted to kill.”  He admitted that Packer had been 'sexually aroused' by the rape of her daughter. A second nurse on duty also heard Sullivan’s confession.

Sara Packer was sentenced to life in prison without parole, for first-degree murder, kidnapping, abuse of a corpse and 16 other charges. Jacob Sullivan has been sentenced to death.

The Pennsylvania state Department of Human Services issued a report that every report about the state of foster care would say in any one of the fifty states; that Pennsylvania's child welfare system is overwhelmed and in need of more accountability.

 In the end, no one in the foster care system, on any level, will lose their job over what they allowed to happen to Grace. It’s the usual story. Nobody in charge of anything is ever held accountable for what happens to these children, these creations of God who expect us, who need us, to protect and defend them.

This isn’t the end of the madness. This is just one story of life in foster care, squandered away. More foster children will be raped, and more foster children will be murdered and unless there is drastic and severe action from the federal level, it will never end.





Word origins : Interesting.............


On writing/ More quotes from writers on writing


“It’s a feeling of happiness that knocks me clean out of adjectives. I think sometimes that the best reason for writing novels is to experience those four and a half hours after you write the final word.” Zadie Smith: The Psychology of the Two Types of Writers

“By using stale metaphors, similes and idioms, you save much mental effort, at the cost of leaving your meaning vague, not only for your reader but for yourself.” George Orwell: Writing, How to Counter the Mindless Momentum of Language, and the Four Questions a Great Writer Must Ask Herself

 “Success consists in felicity of verbal expression, which every so often may result from a quick flash of inspiration but as a rule involves a patient search… for the sentence in which every word is unalterable.” Italo Calvino: The Art of Quickness, Digression as a Hedge Against Death, and the Key to Great Writing

“If you’re going to be a writer you have to be one of the great ones… After all, there are better ways to starve to death.” Gabriel García Márquez on His Unlikely Beginnings as a Writer

 “I doubt I would have written a line … unless some minor tragedy had sort of twisted my mind out of the normal rut.” Roald Dahl: How Illness Emboldens Creativity: A Moving Letter to His Bedridden Mentor

 “When you have made a thorough and reasonably long effort, to understand a thing, and still feel puzzled by it, stop, you will only hurt yourself by going on.” Lewis Carroll: How to Work Through Difficulty and His Three Tips for Overcoming Creative Block

“Just set one day’s work in front of the last day’s work. That’s the way it comes out. And that’s the only way it does.” John Steinbeck: The Diary as a Tool of Discipline, a Hedge Against Self-Doubt, and a Pacemaker for the Heartbeat of Creative Work


“Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time. You have to write up, not down.” E.B. White: How to Write for Children and the Writer’s Responsibility to All Audiences

“If we think that our reader is an idiot, we should not use rhetorical figures, but if we use them and feel the need to explain them, we are essentially calling the reader an idiot. In turn, he will… Umberto Eco’s Advice to Writers

 “All creative art is magic, is evocation of the unseen in forms persuasive, enlightening, familiar and surprising, for the edification of mankind.” Joseph Conrad on Art and What Makes a Great Writer, in a Beautiful Tribute to Henry James

“In any art you’re allowed to steal anything if you can make it better.” Hemingway’s Advice on Writing, Ambition, the Art of Revision, and His Reading List of Essential Books for Aspiring Writers

 “Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.” James Baldwin’s Advice on Writing


“It’s by writing… by stepping back a bit from the real thing to look at it, that we are most present.” Alison Bechdel on Writing, Therapy, Self-Doubt, and How the Messiness of Life Feeds the Creative Conscience


PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***



The John Gassner Memorial Playwriting Award Competition fosters new playwrights and scripts through this important competition established by Molly Gassner, wife of theatre historian John Gassner. The Award was created in 1967 to honor the late John Gassner (1903-1967) for his lifetime dedication to all aspects of professional and academic theatre.
This award will be administered by a panel of judges named by the NETC Executive Board. A staged reading of the award-winning scripts, or of selected scenes from those scripts, may be given at the annual NETC convention and awards ceremony.

***

The Village Playwrights announce a call for submissions for Riot and Revolution, staged readings of short plays to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion and celebrate Gay Pride on Thursday, June 27, 2019 from 7 to 9 pm at the LGBT Community Center, 208 W. 13th St., NYC.  

***

The Chameleon Theatre Circle (located in the Twin Cities area in Minnesota) is seeking original works that have never been produced.  All styles and genres are welcomed (i.e. one-acts, musicals, full length dramas, etc.).  The winning plays are scheduled to be showcased in a concert-format festival in the fall of 2019.  All shows submitted will automatically be placed on the slate of shows in consideration for the 2020/2021 season by the Season Planning Committee.


*** For more information about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** THEATER DISTRICT ***

New York City's Theater District (sometimes spelled Theatre District, and officially zoned as the "Theater Subdistrict"[2]) is an area in Midtown Manhattan where most Broadway theaters are located, as well as many other theaters, movie theaters, restaurants, hotels, and other places of entertainment. It is bounded by West 40th Street on the south, West 54th Street on the north, Sixth Avenue on the east and Eighth Avenue on the west, and includes Times Square. The Great White Way is the name given to the section of Broadway which runs through the Theater District.


***

The West End, located in central London, is London’s theater district and contains around 40 venues. With all the prestige of Broadway (if not more), West End shows are the heavyweights with the big names. They can be any genre including musicals, plays, comedies, or even pantomime (a family-friendly musical comedy). Some of the West End’s hottest stage productions include the world-famous "Hamilton" at the Victoria Palace Theatre; "Matilda The Musical" at the Cambridge Theatre; "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" at the Palace Theatre; and the West End’s longest-running musical, "Les Misérables" at The Queen’s Theatre. 


***

2nd Arrondissement
A great place to sample typical Parisian atmosphere: little passageways and arcades full of shops and small cafés. 
The Paris Stock Market (the Bourse) is also here. Also west from Rue de Richelieu is the "theatre district" with over a dozen theatres including L'Opera Garnier. The pedestrian area of Montorgueil offers restaurants, bars, shops for all kind of budgets.


***

The Boston Theater District is the center of Boston's theater scene. Many of its theaters are on Washington Street, Tremont Street, Boylston Street, and Huntington Avenue. Plays were banned in Boston by the Puritans until 1792.[5][6] Boston's first theater opened in 1793.[7][8] In 1900, the Boston Theater District had 31 theaters, with 50,000 seats.[6] In the 1940s, the city had over 50 theaters.[2] Since the 1970s, developers have renovated old theaters.


***

We formed the Denver Theatre District to bring light, art and activity to the streets of downtown Denver. The DTD launched as a public-private partnership backing the idea that managed outdoor media could support downtown activity and bring exciting unique urban experiences to the public. Over the years the DTD became a key participant in the downtown environment and a force in Denver’s artistic community.


***

Most of the winning shows at the Tony Awards on Friday night will come out of year-round theater meccas London and New York. But have you ever wondered whether there's good theater beyond Broadway and the West End? (Hint: There is.)

Below is a list (in no particular order) of the world's best destinations to see live performances ranging from Sophocles and Samuel Beckett to local artists who haven't made it big yet:

1. Athens, Greece

Athens may be the birthplace of Western theater as we know it, from set design to costuming and plot lines, but there's nothing about its scene that's stuck in the past. There are over 148 dedicated theater stages, which means it has more than any other city in the world. And many of those stages are old amphitheatres, allowing the convergence of Greece's past and present to play out on stage before modern audiences. 


***

The Toronto Theatre District is a part of the Toronto Entertainment District in Downtown Toronto that contains the largest concentration of stage theatres in Canada. It is the third largest English-speaking theatre district in the world, after West End in London and Broadway in New York City.
Most of the theatre district is bounded by Adelaide Street in the north, University Avenue in the east, King Street West in the south, and Bathurst Street in the west. Some notable historic theatres are located beyond these boundaries, for example Tarragon Theatre. Toronto's theatre scene is predominantly clustered in a central area, but expands as far north as Bloor Street, south to the harbour front, and as far east as the Don River.


***

14 THRIVING AMERICAN THEATER DISTRICTS
Nothing says summer like the open road, and with highways and blue skies on the horizon, we’re taking you on a virtual road trip through 14 of America’s liveliest theater districts. From east to west, Boston to Seattle, we’re spotlighting above-the-title theater companies and historic venues worthy of a standing ovation.

But most great shows aren’t free, and if you live for monologues and curtain calls, you know that landing the best seats in the house comes at a price. An easy way to collect more playbills than hotel bills? Book a vacation rental through TripAdvisor to save money on accommodations—especially in these major metro areas, where the cost of a downtown hotel room could be the difference between front-row orchestra seats and the back-row balcony.

We know that location is everything, and with more than 770,000 properties available for rent on TripAdvisor, you can book a home or apartment within walking distance of many incredible venues. Whether you’re captivated by contemporary comedy or high-powered dramas, when it comes to innovative productions and premier talent, these theater districts—some proven performers, others emerging from the wings—are taking center stage.

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On writing: Quotes from writers on writing


  
“My belief of book writing is much the same as my belief as to shoemaking. The man who will work the hardest at it, and will work with the most honest purpose, will work the best.” Anthony Trollope: Witty and Wise Advice on How to Be a Successful Writer

“My belief of book writing is much the same as my belief as to shoemaking. The man who will work the hardest at it, and will work with the most honest purpose, will work the best.” William Styron: Why Formal Education Is a Waste of Time for Writers

“The writer cannot make the seas of distraction stand still, but he [or she] can at times come between the madly distracted and the distractions.” Saul Bellow: How Writers and Artists Save Us from the “Moronic Inferno” of Our Time

“There is something in us, as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored.” Flannery O’Connor: Why the Grotesque Appeals to Us, Plus a Rare Recording of Her Reading

“Writers serve as the memory of a people. They chew over our public past.”Annie Dillard: The Art of the Essay and Narrative Nonfiction vs. Poetry and Short Stories

“Style ought to prove that one believes in an idea; not only that one thinks it but also feels it.” Nietzsche: 10 Rules for Writers


Word origins Polyglot


Polyglot:  Speaking or writing several languages: multilingual. The prefix poly comes from Greek and means "many" or "multi-." Glot comes from the Greek term glōtta, meaning "language" or "tongue." (Glōtta is also the source of glottis, the word for the space between the vocal cords.) 
  
The French word étiquette means "ticket" or "label attached to something for identification." In 16th-century Spain, the French word was borrowed (and altered to etiqueta) to refer to the written protocols describing orders of precedence and behavior demanded of those who appeared at court. Eventually, etiqueta came to be applied to the court ceremonies themselves as well as the documents which outlined the requirements for them. Interestingly, this then led to French speakers of the time attributing the second sense of "proper behavior" to their étiquette, and in the middle of the 18th century English speakers finally adopted both the word and the second meaning from the French




Romero and Juliet/ Well that's a different point of view...




A poem by Richard Brautigan



Kafka’s Hat 


With the rain falling
surgically against the roof,
I ate a dish of ice cream
that looked like Kafka’s hat.
It was a dish of ice cream
tasting like an operating table
with the patient staring
up at the ceiling.



Richard Brautigan


*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***




The John Gassner Memorial Playwriting Award Competition fosters new playwrights and scripts through this important competition established by Molly Gassner, wife of theatre historian John Gassner. The Award was created in 1967 to honor the late John Gassner (1903-1967) for his lifetime dedication to all aspects of professional and academic theatre.
This award will be administered by a panel of judges named by the NETC Executive Board. A staged reading of the award-winning scripts, or of selected scenes from those scripts, may be given at the annual NETC convention and awards ceremony.

***

The Village Playwrights announce a call for submissions for Riot and Revolution, staged readings of short plays to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion and celebrate Gay Pride on Thursday, June 27, 2019 from 7 to 9 pm at the LGBT Community Center, 208 W. 13th St., NYC.  

***

The Chameleon Theatre Circle (located in the Twin Cities area in Minnesota) is seeking original works that have never been produced.  All styles and genres are welcomed (i.e. one-acts, musicals, full length dramas, etc.).  The winning plays are scheduled to be showcased in a concert-format festival in the fall of 2019.  All shows submitted will automatically be placed on the slate of shows in consideration for the 2020/2021 season by the Season Planning Committee.


*** For more information about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** THEATER DISTRICT ***

New York City's Theater District (sometimes spelled Theatre District, and officially zoned as the "Theater Subdistrict"[2]) is an area in Midtown Manhattan where most Broadway theaters are located, as well as many other theaters, movie theaters, restaurants, hotels, and other places of entertainment. It is bounded by West 40th Street on the south, West 54th Street on the north, Sixth Avenue on the east and Eighth Avenue on the west, and includes Times Square. The Great White Way is the name given to the section of Broadway which runs through the Theater District.


***

The West End, located in central London, is London’s theater district and contains around 40 venues. With all the prestige of Broadway (if not more), West End shows are the heavyweights with the big names. They can be any genre including musicals, plays, comedies, or even pantomime (a family-friendly musical comedy). Some of the West End’s hottest stage productions include the world-famous "Hamilton" at the Victoria Palace Theatre; "Matilda The Musical" at the Cambridge Theatre; "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" at the Palace Theatre; and the West End’s longest-running musical, "Les Misérables" at The Queen’s Theatre. 


***

2nd Arrondissement
A great place to sample typical Parisian atmosphere: little passageways and arcades full of shops and small cafés. 
The Paris Stock Market (the Bourse) is also here. Also west from Rue de Richelieu is the "theatre district" with over a dozen theatres including L'Opera Garnier. The pedestrian area of Montorgueil offers restaurants, bars, shops for all kind of budgets.


***

The Boston Theater District is the center of Boston's theater scene. Many of its theaters are on Washington Street, Tremont Street, Boylston Street, and Huntington Avenue. Plays were banned in Boston by the Puritans until 1792.[5][6] Boston's first theater opened in 1793.[7][8] In 1900, the Boston Theater District had 31 theaters, with 50,000 seats.[6] In the 1940s, the city had over 50 theaters.[2] Since the 1970s, developers have renovated old theaters.


***

We formed the Denver Theatre District to bring light, art and activity to the streets of downtown Denver. The DTD launched as a public-private partnership backing the idea that managed outdoor media could support downtown activity and bring exciting unique urban experiences to the public. Over the years the DTD became a key participant in the downtown environment and a force in Denver’s artistic community.


***

Most of the winning shows at the Tony Awards on Friday night will come out of year-round theater meccas London and New York. But have you ever wondered whether there's good theater beyond Broadway and the West End? (Hint: There is.)

Below is a list (in no particular order) of the world's best destinations to see live performances ranging from Sophocles and Samuel Beckett to local artists who haven't made it big yet:

1. Athens, Greece

Athens may be the birthplace of Western theater as we know it, from set design to costuming and plot lines, but there's nothing about its scene that's stuck in the past. There are over 148 dedicated theater stages, which means it has more than any other city in the world. And many of those stages are old amphitheatres, allowing the convergence of Greece's past and present to play out on stage before modern audiences. 


***

The Toronto Theatre District is a part of the Toronto Entertainment District in Downtown Toronto that contains the largest concentration of stage theatres in Canada. It is the third largest English-speaking theatre district in the world, after West End in London and Broadway in New York City.
Most of the theatre district is bounded by Adelaide Street in the north, University Avenue in the east, King Street West in the south, and Bathurst Street in the west. Some notable historic theatres are located beyond these boundaries, for example Tarragon Theatre. Toronto's theatre scene is predominantly clustered in a central area, but expands as far north as Bloor Street, south to the harbour front, and as far east as the Don River.


***

14 THRIVING AMERICAN THEATER DISTRICTS
Nothing says summer like the open road, and with highways and blue skies on the horizon, we’re taking you on a virtual road trip through 14 of America’s liveliest theater districts. From east to west, Boston to Seattle, we’re spotlighting above-the-title theater companies and historic venues worthy of a standing ovation.

But most great shows aren’t free, and if you live for monologues and curtain calls, you know that landing the best seats in the house comes at a price. An easy way to collect more playbills than hotel bills? Book a vacation rental through TripAdvisor to save money on accommodations—especially in these major metro areas, where the cost of a downtown hotel room could be the difference between front-row orchestra seats and the back-row balcony.

We know that location is everything, and with more than 770,000 properties available for rent on TripAdvisor, you can book a home or apartment within walking distance of many incredible venues. Whether you’re captivated by contemporary comedy or high-powered dramas, when it comes to innovative productions and premier talent, these theater districts—some proven performers, others emerging from the wings—are taking center stage.


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