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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Good words to have




Bucolic 

 byoo-KAH-lik 

1: of or relating to shepherds or herdsmen : pastoral

2 a:relating to or typical of rural life

b: pleasing or picturesque in natural simplicity : idyllic



We get bucolic from the Latin word bucolicus, which is ultimately from the Greek word boukolos, meaning "cowherd." When bucolic was first used in English as an adjective in the early 17th century, it meant "pastoral" in a narrow sense—that is, it referred to things related to shepherds or herdsmen and in particular to pastoral poetry. Later in the 19th century, it was applied more broadly to things rural or rustic. Bucolic has also been occasionally used as a noun meaning "a pastoral poem" or "a bucolic person."



Talisman

(TAL-is-man, -iz-) 

1. An object, such as a stone, believed to have occult powers to keep evil away and bring good fortune to its wearer.

2. Anything that has magical powers and brings miraculous effects.

From French or Spanish, from Arabic tilasm, from Greek telesma (consecration), from telein (to consecrate or complete), from telos (result). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kwel- (to revolve), which also gave us colony, cult, culture, cycle, cyclone, chakra, collar, col, and accolade.




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