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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Good words to have



Widdershins 
In a left-handed, wrong, or contrary direction: counterclockwise
English speakers today are most likely to encounter widdershins as a synonym of counterclockwise. But in earliest known uses, found in texts from the early 1500s, widdershins was used more broadly in the sense of "in the wrong way or opposite direction." To say that one's hair "stood widdershins" was, in essence, to say that one was having a bad hair day. By the mid-1500s, English speakers had adopted widdershins to specifically describe movement opposite to the apparent clockwise direction (as seen from the northern hemisphere) of the sun traveling across the sky, which, at the time, could be considered evil or unlucky. The word originates from the Old High German widar, meaning "back" or "against," and sinnen, meaning "to travel."


Orphic
1. Melodious; entrancing. 2. Mystical; occult.
After Orpheus, a musician, poet, and prophet in Greek mythology. His lyre playing and singing could charm animals, trees, and even rocks. After his wife Eurydice, a nymph, died of a snakebite, he traveled to the underworld to bring her back. His music melted the heart of Hades, the god of the underworld, who allowed him to take his wife back on the condition that he not look back at her until they had reached the world of the living. They had almost made it when he looked back and lost her again. His mother Calliope/Kalliope has also given a word to the English language: calliopean. (kuh-lahy-uh-pee-uh n)
adjective
1.resembling a calliope in sound; piercingly loud: a calliopean voice.
In Greek Kalliópē means ”the beautiful voiced” and is the name of the Muse of eloquence, epic poetry, or even of all poetry.
In Greek mythology, Calliope (/kəˈlaɪ.əpiː/ kə-ly-ə-pee; Ancient Greek: Καλλιόπη, Kalliopē "beautiful-voiced") is the muse who presides over eloquence and epic poetry; so called from the ecstatic harmony of her voice. She is spoken of by Hesiod and Ovid as the "Chief of all Muses." She is mostly stated to be the eldest of the Muses, sometimes vying with her sister Urania for the position.
One account says Calliope was the lover of the war god Ares, and bore him several sons: Mygdon, Edonus, Biston, and Odomantus (or Odomas), respectively the founders of Thracian tribes known as the Mygdones, Edones, Bistones, and Odomantes
Calliope also had two famous sons, Orpheus and Linus, by either Apollo or the king Oeagrus of Thrace. She taught Orpheus verses for singing.
According to Hesiod, she was also the wisest of the Muses, as well as the most assertive. Calliope married Oeagrus close to Pimpleia, Olympus. She is said to have defeated the daughters of Pierus, king of Thessaly, in a singing match, and then, to punish their presumption, turned them into magpies. She was sometimes believed to be Homer's muse for the Iliad and the Odyssey. The Roman epic poet, Virgil, invokes her in the Aeneid
Calliope is usually seen with a writing tablet in her hand. At times, she is depicted carrying a roll of paper or a book or wearing a gold crown. She would also be seen with her children.
A little more about her lesser known son, Linus. In Greek mythology Linus refers to the musical son of Oeagrus, nominally Apollo, and the Muse Calliope. As the son of Apollo and a Muse, either Calliope or Terpsichore, he is considered the inventor of melody and rhythm. Linus taught music to his brother Orpheus and then to Heracles. Linus went to Thebes and became a Theban. According to a legend, he wrote the story of Dionysus and of the other mythical legends in Pelasgic writing. His life was ended by Heracles, who killed Linus with his own lyre after he reprimanded Heracles for making errors.



Hyperbole 
Extravagant, exaggeration
The noun comes from the Greek verb hyperballein, meaning "to exceed," not from the name of the Athenian demagogue. Hyperballein itself was formed from hyper-, meaning "beyond," and ballein, "to throw." Unrelated is that in the 5th century B.C. there was a rabble-rousing Athenian, a politician named Hyperbolus, who often made exaggerated promises and claims that whipped people into a frenzy. But even though it sounds appropriate, Hyperbolus' name did not play a role in the development of the m

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