Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***

** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***

Onion Man Productions is accepting submissions for its 10th Anniversary Harvest show of 10-minute plays to be produced in October 2019.
This year’s show will celebrate Onion Man’s past, embrace our present situation, and look forward to our future.  While we don’t have a specific theme for this year’s show, we are seeking plays that deal with letting go of the past, new beginnings and/or “rising from the ashes.”

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The Children’s Play Initiative aims to highlight new works that inspire and engage children audience. Previously, we have showcased numerous successful productions in the cultural exchange between China and the United States which stands as the basis for the Lotus Lee Foundation. Winning entries will display a distinct understanding of the unlimited possibilities of theatre through compelling and dynamic stories with intriguing plots, fascinating characters and an informed global perspective.

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NuBox theater is seeking 10 to 20 minute plays that are centered around the importance of mental health and the reality of coping with a mental illness. The goal is to bring more awareness to mental health and to educate people on mental illnesses.

*** For more information about these and other opportunities see the web site at https://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** POLITICAL THEATER *** 

It is surely because politics and theatre share so many qualities that, of all the artforms that are now reflecting back to us the world that we live in, it is theatre that is most adroitly and directly addressing its politics (though of course it would be naive to suggest that any artistic gesture is entirely untinged by the political). Unlike music, dance and visual art it is theatre’s wordiness – the fact that it likes to place people in a room and have them talk, and disagree – that makes it the artform most closely allied to politics. 

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The best political plays, from The Crucible to The Jungle – picked by David Hare, James Graham and more

A gripping story of the Calais camp. A caper about media greed. A pair of startling dramas from Caryl Churchill. Leading playwrights choose their favourite political plays

In 1992 I was starting to get interested in politics and I remember so clearly the headline: “It’s The Sun Wot Won It”. A newspaper claiming it controlled an entire election, and they were probably right. That headline stained me, but I wouldn’t have a clue how to write about it. James Graham’s Ink examines how that headline was written, or, rather how the paper behind it was made.

A play in two acts about the rebirth of the Sun under Rupert Murdoch, it’s written like a caper. In act one you fall in love – how can these characters destroy the dusty institutions around them? In act two you watch your lover make all the wrong decisions. The caper sours as people and events are increasingly abused.

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Barely three months after completing its extended run at New York Theatre Workshop and the Greenwich House Theater, Heidi Schreck’s What the Constitution Means to Me has made the jump to Broadway. At this point, it isn’t hard to find out what I think about the play — or, for that matter, what Tony Kushner thinks of it — and so I thought, in the show’s own spirit of debate, it would be great to talk to someone about it. Enter my colleague Irin Carmon, a senior correspondent at New York and co-author of Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I spend most of my waking life writing about theater; Irin spends hers writing about where gender, the law, and politics meet. What the Constitution Means to Me might be called, to steal from its own metaphors, a crucible of all of the above. So Irin and I took to Google Chat to see what Schreck’s “living, warm-blooded, steamy document” means to us.

Irin Carmon: My first theater writing — how should we start?

Sara Holdren: Well, are there specific things from the show that you’re still thinking about today? Things that stuck with you?

I.C.: I need to confess that I was afraid I would hate it.

S.H.: Oh, that’s fascinating! Why?

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On Monday night, at the historic Riverside Church in Manhattan, an audience was treated to a powerful live reading of "The Investigation: A Search for the Truth in Ten Acts," by stars including John Lithgow, Jason Alexander, Annette Bening, Kyra Sedgwick and Alyssa Milano. The play, written by the Pulitzer Prize winning Robert Schenkkan, was a dramatization of the Mueller Report that used the actual text for dialogue.

In an email interview with me, Schenkkan explained that he wrote the play out of frustration that the Trump administration had been "successful in obstructing the narrative" from the moment that Attorney General William Barr outlined the findings.

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The idea behind “Kristina Wong for Public Office”  is that I run for small local offices while simultaneously performing campaign events around town.  If elected, I serve with the same sensibility and skills I have as a performance artist and report on the experience of being a public servant in my performances.  My campaign events have included debates with dogs and giving a stump speech while literally being tied to a stake and stoned by an audience. These shorter performances culminate in an evening long campaign spectacular called “Kristina Wong for Public Office” that will be performed parallel to actual campaign events leading up to the 2020 Presidential Election.  

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Adapted by Aaron Sorkin from Harper Lee's 1960 novel about principled small-town Alabama lawyer Atticus Finch, who takes on the defense of a local black sharecropper falsely accused of raping a white woman in 1934, the drama has struck an emotional chord with audiences in a time of resurgent race-based intolerance and shocking hate crimes like the 2015 church shootings in Charleston, S.C., and the violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., two years later.

The production also has acquired the status of event theater, with its rich thematic scope, its large cast of 23 and its ability to address topical themes in stirring theatrical fashion, while eloquently championing the virtues of human decency.

It has not played to an unsold seat at a single performance since the start of previews Nov. 1, registering the kind of weekly numbers more customary for a musical than a play, and recouping its entire $8 million investment just 19 weeks after its Dec. 13 official opening.

"The success of To Kill a Mockingbird so quickly out of the gate is — beyond our obvious pride in what we made — actually a testament to Harper Lee and the power of her novel," Rudin told The Hollywood Reporter. "Forty-five million copies is a lot of books, and we're the beneficiaries of what she created." 

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