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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

Hollywood scandals: Slut-shamed




Ingrid Bergman was a strong-willed, ambitious and intelligent Oscar-winning actress who enjoy the occasional drink, she smoked, and every now and then strayed out of her marriages to have an affair. The problem was, she was revered in America and caste as something of a saint. They wanted her to be the adorable nun that she played in The Bells of St. Mary's (1945)
Bergman was tired of her enormously popular but largely fluff films she had made and longed for a strong meaty party, so she wrote to Italian neorealist director Roberto Rossellini.

Dear Roberto,

I saw your films Open City and Paisan and enjoyed them very much. If you need a Swedish actress who speaks English very well, who has not forgotten her German, who is not very understandable in French, and who in Italian knows only “ti amo,” I am ready to come and make a film with you.

Ingrid Bergman

He invited her to come to Italy and read for a part in his new latest film Stromboli which she did. (Rossellini replaced his previous lover, Anna Magnani, with Bergman) During production in Sicily, Bergman fell in love with Rossellini, they began an affair, and Bergman became pregnant and their worlds exploded.

Bergman’s Swedish surgeon, husband Dr. Petter Lindstrom, with whom she had a 10-year-old daughter, Pia, refused to cooperate when she wrote to him asking for a divorce. Word got out to the press that the marriage was on the rocks due to her infidelity. 
In the summer of 1949 rumors that Bergman was pregnant made the press. Finally, in December the pregnancy was confirmed the press went wild, literally camping outside the actresses door. On February 2, 1950, she gave birth to a boy, Robertino. A while later
Bergman and Rossellini’s film Stromboli opened in theaters and tanked completely. Ed Sullivan withdrew an offer to have her on his program, but Steve Allen’s equally popular show had her on as a guest because the public wanted to see her, they were interested in what she had to so for herself and her circumstances.
United States Senator Edwin C. Johnson of Colorado, for some reason known only to him, actually denounced Bergman and Rossellini (He called Rossellini a “love pirate and a home wrecker.”) on the Senate floor and suggested that the Congress enact a bill to ban from theaters, actors found guilty of immorality and lewdness and moral turpitude.

Johnson

She divorced her husband  by proxy through a Mexican court and making matters worse, in the public’s view anyway, she left her daughter Pia to return to Rossellini in Europe. The couple were married on May 24, 1950. (The husband later secured sole custody of Pia)
All that passionate and intrigue came to naught. The couple fought, Bergman was bored as a housewife and spent herself into debt. She started to drink too much. Eventually, she left him. Slowly the public’s outrage passed and when won the Best Actress Oscar in March 1957, she received a standing ovation.   “I’ve gone” she said “from saint to whore and back to saint again, all in one lifetime”