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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***



We are seeking monologues about a transformation while putting on (or taking off) a dress. (“Dress” can be a uniform, costume, smock, etc.) This experience could be connected to a ritual, magic, an awakening, an everyday epiphany. A few questions to consider: Why this dress? Why now? (How) does the dress fit? How does the person feel in this dress? What does the person want to do in or to the dress? Are there regrets? Expectations? What doors might open or close?

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9th Annual Festival of Shorts - We are so excited to announce our theme for 2018, “Be Careful What You Wish For”. Sometimes the things we most desire can lead to horrible, hilarious and completely unexpected outcomes even when we get our “heart’s desire.” How will you incorporate this truth in your original short script? Make it amazing and maybe we’ll see you at our Festival in July!

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Keegan Boiler Room Series Play and Musical Submissions - The Boiler Room Series is committed to supporting the development of new plays and musicals. Five plays or musicals will be selected to be workshopped and performed as Boiler Room Series staged readings over the course of the in 2017-2018 season, and selected scenes from all 5 plays will be showcased in a festival in July.


*** FOR MORE INFORMATION about these and other opportunities see http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** ANGELS IN AMERICA BACK ON BROADWAY ***

Tony Kushner's Tony Award-winning two-part drama Angels in America begins performances of its first Broadway revival on February 23. Two-time Tony winner Marianne Elliott directs the pair of works about the early years of AIDS—titled Millennium Approaches and Perestroika—slated to officially open on March 25 at the Neil Simon Theatre. The cast is led by two-time Tony winner Nathan Lane and Tony nominee Andrew Garfield.

Returning to Broadway for the first time since its original production opened in 1993, this new staging had its world premiere in 2017 with London's National Theatre. The revival features Lane in the titanic role of Roy Cohn, with Garfield as Pryor Walter, Lee Pace as Joe Pitt, Denise Gough as Harper Pitt, James McArdle as Louis Ironson, Susan Brown as Hannah Pitt and Nathan Stewart-Jarrett as Belize. The role of the Angel is shared by Amanda Lawrence and Tony nominee Beth Malone.

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Mr. Kushner said he is trying to be less of a “crazy horror” when it comes to dealing with directors. He has always been a compulsive rewriter, adding lines and even entire scenes at the last minute. And he’s famous for his notes — detailed instructions scribbled on yellow notepads — and his emails. “They’re legendary, the barrage of notes,” said James McArdle, the Scottish actor playing Louis, the most Kushner-like character, in the new production. “I once asked him the meaning of a three-word sentence and got back a 10-page email.”

Mr. Kushner is also famous for quarreling with practically every director he’s ever worked with. He even fired Mr. Eustis, one of his best friends. He screamed at George C. Wolfe, the director of “Angels” on Broadway, and he reduced Declan Donnellan, who directed the 1993 London production, to sobbing. Mr. Donnellan was so frustrated by a nightly onslaught of Kushner faxes that he agreed to direct “Perestroika,” the second half of the play, on two conditions: Mr. Kushner could not even be in the United Kingdom during rehearsals, and he could attend the second preview, but not the first, only if he sat in the audience without his pen and yellow pad.

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What made (and makes) Angels revolutionary is its Whitmanesque breadth—it is large, it contains multitudes—along with its refusal to distinguish between the political and the personal, the mundane and the mystical; its audacity in placing the dark years of the Reagan revolution and the AIDS epidemic in the stream of American history, from the Mormon migration to the McCarthy hearings; and its wild humor, extravagant theatrical imagination, fierce moral outrage, and boundless compassion. Though it echoes both Brecht and George Bernard Shaw, it stands in its distinct Americanness alongside the best of Eugene O’Neill, Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller. “It’s an actual masterpiece by a living playwright that transcends its time and subject matter,” Elliott says. “Hamlet is not really about being a Danish prince, but that’s the context in which it grows, and you could say the same about Angels in America.”

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Tony Kushner interviewed by Charlie Rose about the film adaptation of “Angels in America”


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“More Life” is the rallying cry of Prior Walter at the close of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America. If a revival is the essence of “more life” for a play, then as the National Theatre in London prepares to “fly” these Angels back to Broadway for the first time in twenty-five years, it seems a fitting point to reflect on the act of revival, theatrical history, and the art of theatrical progress. 

Production of Angels in America began in 1988 in San Francisco. Following workshops in San Francisco and Los Angeles, it made its way to the National Theatre in 1993 in a co-production with theatre company Cheek by Jowl. The National Theatre played a key role in developing the play, and on a technicality, opened three days ahead of the Broadway production. On 20 November 1993, Parts One: Millennium Approaches and Two: Perestroika officially opened in London. The announcement that Angels would be returning to the National Theatre in 2017 was a neat bookend to the production’s history.

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New Yorker November 30, 1992

Tony Kushner's Paradise Lost

Tony Kushner marks the date of his coming out as September, 1981, when he called his mother from an East Village pay phone to tell her he was gay. That was about the time doctors first detected a strange new syndrome afflicting male homosexuals and eight months before Kushner met and then moved in with his first lover. Seven years later, when he began writing "Angels in America," he was newly separated, and aids was the dominant feature of the gay landscape. Kushner, however, did not set out to record the horror of aids alone but the horror of American life during the nineteen-eighties—the triumph of heartlessness and the withering of community. His two-part, seven-hour-long play, subtitled “A Gay Fantasia on National Themes," might also be called a Reagan fantasia, commemorating a time when selfishness was extolled as a social good and self-sacrifice scorned as psychopathology, an era when people, jammed into pre-drilled holes, not surprisingly splintered. Kushner's characters do the wrong thing: a young word processor at a courthouse deserts his aids-stricken lover, and a Mormon law clerk in the same courthouse stifles his homosexuality, thus gutting his own life and that of his wife. To the story of these two imaginary couples Kushner adds the corrosive figure of the late Roy Cohn. Writing in this magazine last week, John Lahr declared that in the two halves of “Angels" (“Millennium Approaches" and "Perestroika") Kushner has "made a little piece of American theatre history." He wrote, “From its first beat, 'Angels in America' exhibited a ravishing command of its characters and of the discourse it wanted to have through them with our society."


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Excerpt from the ANGELS IN AMERICAN film from 2003

“Real love isn’t ambivalent”



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ANGELS IN AMERICA press reels from the original 1993 production


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