Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRITING CLASSES ***



Online Beginner and Intermediate Playwriting classes offered by award-winning playwright, Kate Moira Ryan (25 Questions for a Jewish Mother and Beebo Brinker). Taught online using Google Hangout, scripts are uploaded onto Google drive. Easy to use, you can take the class anywhere. The class is a writers' workshop format. Writers upload 7 pages each week which are read aloud by your classmates. Classes run for 4 weeks($250) and 8 weeks($400) cycles and new sessions start in June. 




*** PRIMARY STAGES SUMMER CLASSES ***

THE FIRST DRAFT at Primary Stages ESPA! This class will guide you through the development of your first draft, providing deadlines, feedback, and a collaborative environment to encourage you to get your ideas on the page. LEAH NANAKO WINKLER (Kentucky, EST) creates a collaborative environment where you are encouraged to bring in unfiltered pages and give and receive feedback from classmates in a safe space. ABE KOOGLER (Kill Floor, LCT) will help you identify your unconscious impulses, calm your doubts and worries, and write toward the unknown. EDDIE SANCHEZ (Barefoot Boy with Shoes On, Primary Stages) establishes a safe place to try things. Payment plans available. http://primarystages.org/espa/writing/the-first-draft 
 

*** NYSUMMERFEST PLAYWRIGHT/MUSICAL/ONE ACT/ SHORT FESTIVAL COMPETITION ***

ONLY SPOTS IN SEPTEMBER AVAILABLE 
SUBMISSIONS WANTED
Welcome to the best and most supportive festival in US Play and Musicals between 5 and 90 minutes accepted
TO SUBMIT

BEST PLAY OR MUSICAL  $3,500
BEST DIRECTOR, ACTRESS, ACTOR, SINGER EACH $500 BEST STAGE MANAGER, SET DESIGNER AND LIGHTING DESIGNER EACH $200 BEST MUSIC SCORE $300 BEST ORIGINAL PLAY $200
NO FEES REQUIRED TO SUBMIT  TO THIS FESTIVAL.
WHY YOU WILL NOT FIND ANY OTHER FESTIVAL EVER THAT OFFERS ALL WE OFFER

Submissions Accepted from Everywhere in the US Shows from outside NY and NJ can only run if the entire cast and crew are from New York City.


*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***

Big Apple Theater Festival seeks short plays for our JUNE short play series
Theme of the play MUST be "scenes from a bar/restaurant"
Concept can either be dramatic or comedic 
Setting should be a bar/restaurant 
MUST be no longer than 10-12 minutes 

***
Small Fish Radio is looking for material for our new weekly podcast, 
THE APPROXIMATELY 20-MINUTE VARIETY HOUR. 
STEP ONE: LISTEN to The Approximately 20-Minute Variety Hour
STEP TWO: What to write? TWO-MINUTE SOAP OPERA – serialized: four to eight 2-3 minute episodes for a one story arc.
NO MORE THAN 3 MINUTES (run time) PER EPISODE
FLASH FAIRY TALE, MIDDLE AGED FANTASY – 1-2 minute fairy tales or stories.

***
The submission window for Deathscribe X, the 10th Annual Festival of Horror Radio Plays. Every year we seek 10-minute radio scripts that are genuinely scary, imaginative, chilling, intelligent, suspenseful, horrific or downright grotesque. Writers may submit up to two radio plays to Deathscribe in any given year. Five scripts will be selected from all submissions. These five pieces will be performed on stage in front of a live audience. The writer of the winning piece, chosen by a celebrity panel of judges, will receive the coveted Bloody Axe Award, as well as a $100 cash prize.


*** FOR MORE INFORMATION about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** WATERGATE ***

STAGE: 'DICK DETERRED,' A WATERGATE MUSICAL

YOU get the idea of ''Dick Deterred,'' a musical at the No Smoking Playhouse commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Watergate affair, right from its punning name, a play on Shakespeare's ''Richard III,'' which provides the format from which this takeoff takes off.

The book and lyrics for this clever political satire are by David Edgar, who adapted ''Nicholas Nickleby'' from novel to stage, and by William Schimmel, who wrote the music and who plays the accordion and piano in musical accompaniment during performance. Mr. Edgar wrote the piece in Britain in 1974, while the Watergate scandal was still a burning issue. Mr. Schimmel has written new music for this United States premiere.

Mr. Edgar has drawn his dialogue - elegantly and often wittily - from a Shakespearean matrix, although the story is Watergate. The characters wear business suits that, at bottom, become vestigial knee breeches, with long stockings and courtly shoes. Richard Nixon is a sly, evil Richard, surrounded by courtiers no less machinating. John Lord Hastings is a corporation lawyer, later Attorney General. H.R. (Bob) Buckingham is an advertising executive, later White House Chief of Staff. Eugene McClarence, duke and Senator from Minnesota, is done in by Richard, Mayor of Chicago.

More…


***

Was This ‘Lear’ Inspired by Watergate?

“WHAT, ‘King Lear’ again?” said playwright friend on hearing of this assignment. “Why not review it as if it were a new play?”

As it turned out, my friend was partly right. Shakespeare, the old sneak, is always new. When the theater or the world is changing, you can feel it in the muscles of his plays, as those that have lain unemphasized for a few years start to flex again.

Seeing Edwin Sherin's new staging of “Lear” in Central Park's Delacorte Theater, realized it was not the “Lear” I thought I knew. ‘T'hat, it turned out, was a play “written” by Peter Brook and Jan Kott — inspired by Beckett's “Endgame”—a play full of senility and meaningless violence and barrenness, dead pauses, dead feelings, living‐dead characters. We have lived with that “Lear” for over a decade; it is no disrespect to Brook, Kott and Beckett to say it might be time for a new one. Though the current production is not epoch‐making, it is a good start along the way.

More…

***

Watergate: A Musical

To launch act two, folksy Sam Ervin could bound on for a hoedown about the only three things he trusts, "God, Country and Caroline"--Caroline being, of course, his beloved state of North Carolina--and it wouldn't hurt to have him kick up his heels the way they do in "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas." Maybe some of the Watergate burglars could do "The Wiretap Blues," a tap dance, silhouetted against the D.C. jail--sort of like "Too Darn Hot" in "Kiss Me Kate," only more topical. And what if--oh just what if--Nixon admitted he'd always wanted to be in show biz? Better still, that he'd always dreamed of teaming up with Groucho Marx! Can't you see it? Straw hat, cane, sandpaper shuffle. The man they said you'd never buy a used car from actually going out on the stage and selling 'em a soft-shoe.

The intermission could even be 18 1/2 minutes.

WELL, READY or not, Broadway, here it is: the summation of 10 years of headlines and melodrama, anguish, soul-searching and inadvertent comedy--Watergate as a musical, clearly labeled, so as not to confuse the dimwitted, "Watergate, a Musical." Currently tucked away through the end of the month at the Alliance Theatre here, the $500,000 production stars Gene Barry, once Bat Masterson himself, as Richard Nixon, and a supporting cast of 22, mostly Atlantans, as everyone else. The authors, two middle-aged West Coast writers, Tommy Oliver and Ed Lakso, say they chose Atlanta as their tryout city because "it's a progressive town," and "when you come from L.A. and the film community, the theater world is a rather closed one." But later they'll admit, "We really came down here to hide out from the critics."

More…

***

Review/Theater; Martha Mitchell, the Outspoken Watergate Wife

Speaking her mind during the depths of Watergate, Martha Mitchell was either a virago gone haywire or a protector of democratic principles. David Wolpe's play ''The Unguided Missile'' bolsters the first description, while making it clear that Mrs. Mitchell kept her tunnel vision fixed firmly on the interests of herself and her husband, John N. Mitchell, the indicted former Attorney General.

The Martha Mitchell portrayed on stage by Estelle Parsons at the American Place Theater is no closet liberal. She is also far too shallow a figure to justify a play about her, or, at least, to justify this play about her. Expecting a vivid display of character coloration or at least an amusing political comedy, one finds a tiresome story about a scold who is victimized by her own bluntness.

The woman's unpredictability, Martha Mitchell as ''unguided missile,'' momentarily holds the audience's interest, which is quenched by the lameness of Mr. Wolpe's dramaturgy and of Fred Kolo's direction. Filling the stage with a camera crew and television monitors only makes one curious to know what programs are being broadcast on other channels.

More…

***

MARK FELT, SUPERSTAR

The York Theatre Company will present the exciting and intriguing new Watergate musical MARK FELT, SUPERSTAR, as part of our New2NY Series this Winter.  When former FBI agent Mark Felt revealed in 2005 that he had been Deep Throat, the secret source who helped Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein bring down President Richard Nixon, he ended one of the most intriguing chapters in the history of journalism (and one of the worst in U.S. politics).  

More…

***

FROST/NIXON

Television mows down a titan in “Frost/Nixon,” the briskly entertaining new play by Peter Morgan about the 1977 face-off between its title characters, the British talk show host (as in David) and the former American president (as in Richard M.). But let it be proclaimed, with drums and fanfare, that theater decisively trumps television in the production that opened last night at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theater.

Most of the credit for this victory belongs to a truly titanic performance from the man playing the famously sweaty victim of a cool medium. That’s Frank Langella, whose portrayal of Nixon is one of those made-for-the-stage studies in controlled excess in which larger-than-life seems truer-to-life than merely life-size ever could.

No screen, big or small, could accommodate such showy grandeur. And it’s telling that when this production — which recreates the story behind the widely watched television interviews between Nixon and Mr. Frost (the excellent Michael Sheen) — projects Mr. Langella’s image onto the bank of monitors at the back of the stage, his face registers as that of some grotesque mythic creature in uncomfortable captivity.

More…
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