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Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***




Mad Apple Collective seeks one-act plays (UK - open to all playwrights)
The Locked Room
Four intriguing one-act plays set in the confines of a locked room…
We are looking for four brand-new one-act plays, which bring a sense of dark intrigue and mystery to our theme The Locked Room.
What can happen when people find themselves locked in a room? Who are they, how did they come to be there and is there a purpose to their incarceration? Yet more intriguing do they (all) get out?

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Pride Films and Plays is delighted to announce that submissions for the 2017 LezPlay Contest are now open.
The mission of LezPlay is to enhance the visibility and advance the viability of lesbian-centered stories for the stage. To that end, LezPlay honors excellence in storytelling by women-identified writers who present lesbian characters and themes—past, present, and future—in a pivotal, positive way.

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Balkan Regional Playwrights Contest for Children’s Drama 2017 play submission window will be open. Anybody over the age of 18, regardless of education, country or region may submit a play to the Balkan Regional Playwrights Contest for Children’s Drama 2017. Plays must be intended for children and teens


*** FOR MORE INFORMATION about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** WAR OF THE THEATRES ***

The War of the Theatres is the name commonly applied to a controversy from the later Elizabethan theatre; Thomas Dekker termed it the Poetomachia

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War of the theatres, in English literary history, conflict involving the Elizabethan playwrights Ben Jonson, John Marston, and Thomas Dekker. It covered a period when Jonson was writing for one children’s company of players and Marston for another, rival group.

In 1599 Marston presented a mildly satirical portrait of Jonson in his Histriomastix. That same year Jonson replied in Every Man Out of His Humour, ridiculing Marston’s style as “fustian.” Some scholars have thought that the character of Brabant Senior in Marston’s Jack Drum’s Entertainment (1599) was a lampoon on Jonson, though this is disputed. Marston certainly thought himself attacked in Jonson’s Cynthia’s Revels (c. 1600), and he satirized Jonson as Lampatho Doria in What You Will (1601). Meanwhile, in Poetaster (1601) Jonson represented Marston as an inferior poet and a plagiarist; he also extended the attack to Dekker, satirized as a hack playwright. Dekker replied with Satiro-mastix (1601), which lampooned Jonson as “the humorous poet.” The quarrel had been patched up by 1604, when Marston dedicated The Malcontent to Jonson.

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Shakespeare and the Poets' War In a remarkable piece of detective work, Shakespeare scholar James Bednarz traces the Bard s legendary wit-combats with Ben Jonson to their source during the Poets War. Bednarz offers the most thorough reevaluation of this War of the Theaters since Harbage’s Shakespeare and the Rival Traditions, revealing a new vision of Shakespeare as a playwright intimately concerned with the production of his plays, the opinions of his rivals, and the impact his works had on their original audiences. Rather than viewing Shakespeare as an anonymous creator, Shakespeare and the Poets War re-creates the contentious entertainment industry that fostered his genius when he first began to write at the Globe in 1599. Bednarz redraws the Poets War as a debate on the social function of drama and the status of the dramatist that involved not only Shakespeare and Jonson but also the lesser known John Marston and Thomas Dekker. 

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Comical Satire and the War of the Theatres

At the same time that Jonson was competing with Daniel and Drayton for patronage for his lyric poetry, he was also redirecting his theatrical energies toward the more literate and sophisticated members of the Elizabethan public. In Every Man out of His Humour (1599) and Cynthia’s Revels (1600) he extended the comedy of humours into a distinctive form of ‘comical satire’ orientated toward the taste of the London gallants and wits with whom he increasingly associated. Yet while his poetic skill and classical learning gained him entry into elite social and intellectual circles, his poverty and low status made his position tenuous, and his ridicule of fashionable folly risked offending the very groups from whom he sought patronage.

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Shakespeare in the text of the Parnassus plays

William Shakespeare is alluded to often, and his works are quoted by one count at least 95 times in the three Parnassus plays.[17] He is explicitly mentioned by name in the last two plays. At almost every turn he is satirized or mocked, which is to be expected in a satire, and also when the target of the satire has become very successful and well known.[18]

The Parnassus plays are seen, at least in part, as extending the war of words that had been occurring between the university men and those who were not part of that group. The university men would include Cambridge alumni Thomas Nashe and Robert Greene, who both had attacked Shakespeare in print: Nashe in his pamphlet, Pierce Penniless, and Greene in Greene's Groats-Worth of Wit. Shakespeare had replied in turn with some mockery of Nashe in his play Loves Labours Lost.[19]

Shakespeare and his theatre company, were on tour probably in 1601, and visited Oxford and Cambridge, sometime between the performances of parts two and three of the trilogy. This is indicated on the title-page of the first quarto of Hamlet (1603), where the play is said to have been acted “in the two Universities.”[20]

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The pilgrimage to Parnassus with the two parts of The return from Parnassus. Three comedies performed in St. John's college, Cambridge, A.D. 1597-1601. Ed. from mss. by the Rev. W.D. Macray"


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The War of the Theatres
1897


"The War of the Theatres" is a term which has been applied to the quarrels of Marston and Dekker with Ben Jonson, which found expression in satirical plays. To this "war" is due the close relationship which exists between the works of these dramatists between 1598 and 1602. Whether any other dramatists took part in this contest is almost wholly conjectural, and the present discussion of the subject will be confined chiefly to the works of the three authors mentioned. 
That Shakespeare may have taken a hand in the quarrel seems altogether likely from the well-known passage in The Rctiun frovi Parnassus ; but there is no other direct evidence that he did, and the indirect evidence is, unfortunately, inconclusive. 

This monograph is an attempt to show the relationship of the plays of which it treats, as regards the personal satire contained in them, by setting forth such evidence as has been found for the identification of the characters. The plays which will be discussed, in whole or in part, are Every Man in his Humour, Histrioniastix, The Case is Altered, Every Man out of his Humour, Patient Grissil, Jack Drum, Cynthia’s Revels, Antonio and Mellida, Part I., Poetaster, Satiromastix, What you Will, The Return from Parnassus, and Troilus and Cressida. 

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THE JONSON ALLUSION-BOOK
A COLLECTION OF ALLUSIONS TO BEN JONSON FROM 1597 TO 1700
1922

This volume proposes to do for Jonson what The Shakespeare Allusion-Book does for Shakespeare. While primarily intended to set forth the materials, within the limits specified, relating to Jonson's career as a man of letters, and to disclose the estimates of his genius as expressed by his contemporaries and immediate successors, it will also incidentally supply information on a variety of subjects connected with the literature of the time. For example, it will be of service as a partial allusion book to many poets of the Elizabethan and Jacobean ages; and it will be of no little
value as a body of seventeenth-century dramatic criticism.

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HISTRIO-MASTIX

Full text of "Histrio-Mastix : The players scourge, or, Actors Tragaedie, divided into two parts : wherein it is largely evidenced, by divers Arguments ... that popular stage-playes ... are sinfull, heathenish, lewde, ungodly spectacles, and most pernicious corruptions ... and that the profession of play-poets, of stage players, together with the penning, acting, and frequenting of stage-playes, are unlawfull, infamous and misbeseeming Christians"


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EVERY MAN OUT OF HIS HUMOUR


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JACK DRUM’S ENTERTAINMENT


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CYNTHIA’S REVELS


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WHAT YOU WILL


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THE POETASTER


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SATIRO-MASTIX


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THE MALCONTENT


Dedication of The Malcontent from John Marston to Ben Jonson

BENIAMINO JONSONIO POETAE ELEGANTISSIMO GRAVISSIMO
AMICO SVO CANDIDO ET CORDATO, JOHANNES MARSTON 
MUSARUM ALUMNUS ASPERAM HANC SVAM THALIAM D. D.


Roughly translated by Google Translate:

Poet Benjamin Jonson
Honest and wise  to his friend,
John Marston
Student of the Muses
Tart for it is Thalia
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