Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***



Tenured Son Theatre currently seeking full-length plays for inaugural 2018 season. No restrictions on subject matter however set changes and tech requirements should be kept to a minimum. Looking for great dialogue, excellent character development and a new/unique perspective. Please read the following guidelines before submitting:
1. Play must be new, full-length (preferably 80-120 minutes). One act plays are permitted as long as they meet the preferred time span. Going over or under the preferred time will not exclude your play from consideration. It is merely a suggested length. Plays that have received a production on any scale are not allowed. However, staged readings or workshopped plays are allowed.

***
Princess Grace Award
We encourage emerging playwrights to apply at the beginning of their careers so that through the New Dramatists Fellowship, they can develop their work as well as benefit from being a part of a unique, diverse, dynamic community of professional playwrights. An applicant’s status as an emerging playwright is evaluated during the adjudication process. One playwright will be selected to receive:
• A grant in the amount of $7,500
• A one-season (September – June) artistic residency at New Dramatists, Inc. in New York City (For Award recipients living outside of the New York metro area, your on-site residency can be adapted according to your schedule with reimbursement provided for transportation costs to/from New York)

***

Following Nick Darke's death the Nick Darke Award was conceived in 2006 by his wife, the artist and film-maker Jane Darke, with the support of his family. Nick Darke wrote in many forms but earned his living in the world of theatre, screen and radio. The Award is funded by Falmouth University through the Academy of Music and Theatre Arts (AMATA) and the School of Writing & Journalism. The relationship between Falmouth and the Award recognises Nick Darke's impact across the arts and endeavours to continue his legacy through the promotion of talent.

*** FOR MORE INFORMATION about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** STAGE FIGHT ***

Stage combat is a specialised technique in theatre designed to create the illusion of physical combat without causing harm to the performers. It is employed in live stage plays as well as operatic and ballet productions. With the advent of cinema and television the term has widened to also include the choreography of filmed fighting sequences, as opposed to the earlier live performances on stage. It is closely related to the practice of stunts and is a common field of study for actors. Several actors famous for their stage fighting skills have backgrounds in dance or martial arts training.

More…

***
Swinging Swords And Side Shuffles: The Dangerous Tango Of Stage Combat

Most theater-goers are familiar with the iconic Shakespearean scene from “Henry V” when the titular king shouts out to his soldiers: “Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more!”
But how do the actors — many of whom are swinging swords and shields — ensure that once they go unto the breach, no one gets an eye poked out? That’s where stage combat training comes in.

More…

***
Student was seriously injured by sword during school play rehearsal, lawsuit alleges
According to the suit, the injury occurred June 4, 2010, during a rehearsal of the play “The Revenge of Three Sisters." The plaintiff's son was 14 at the time, playing the town sheriff. As the other student made his way toward him, the suit says, he attempted to "deflect the sword." However, the suit says, the "thrust of the sword pierced into his right orbit." The boy suffered lasting injuries, the suit says, including weakness to his left side and an inability to properly raise his eyelid.

More…

***
The Society of American Fight Directors is an internationally recognized non-profit organization dedicated to promoting safety and fostering excellence in the art of stage combat. Whether you are a producer, director, actor or teacher, we can help accelerate your stage combat skills.

More…

***
How to Have a Happy Fight Call: A Guide for Directors, Stage Managers, and Fight Captains

The time has come. The punches have been knapped and all the falls are safe. Now it is time to work those fights until we know them in our bones. Fight call is upon us. You excited about it? I am. Before we start swinging at each other, a few tips, tricks, and reminders:
Fight call is the time to check in with performers about how things went last night and to address any problems from the previous rehearsal or run. Checking in with the performers can be as simple as asking, “Are there any concerns or questions from last night?” The actors need to check in with their fight partners (“How did that grapple sequence go for you last night?”) and tell you about any concerns they are having (“So and so is actually pulling my hair, even after I let them know. Can you talk to them?”).

More…

***
Swordplay is New York City's oldest continuously running stage combat teaching organization, dedicated to providing training to professional actors in the techniques of safe and effective stage combat. Established in 1995, Swordplay continues to offer an eclectic array of classes and workshops, all taught by some of New York's most experienced, sought after and internationally recognized stage combat professionals.

More…

***
Blanchett injured in stage fight

A witness, who was at last night's performance at the Sydney Theatre in Walsh Bay, said Edgerton accidentally hit Blanchett in the head with a '60s-style radio. The impact could be heard in the audience and the actress and STC co-artistic director fell down on all fours. Several people said they could see blood streaming down the back of Blanchett's head. She went off stage to fetch clothes for Stanley's wife, Stella (Robin McLeavy), and used some of them to try to staunch the flow of blood.


***
Why Everyone Should Study Stage Combat

“Professional Fight Director and Stage Combat Instructor” is apparently one of the best jobs one can possibly have when attending a cocktail party (though for the record, I would like to state that I always say “playwright” first). Outside of the worlds of theatre and film, a surprising number of intelligent and educated people are unaware that the job actually exists. And once they do know, there is a lot of curiosity about how our work is done.
Over the past few years I’ve been teaching a whole lot of Intro to Stage Combat workshops in various settings, and I’ve been saying for quite some time that the basics of stage combat are essential skills for actors, as well as incredibly useful for other disciplines within theatre and film. I would add that taking such a workshop could be a really interesting adventure for those outside of professional entertainment, and in many ways one of the clearest ways to experience how theatre works.

More…

***
Conan O’Brien “Stage Combat Class”

-- 

No comments: