Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

John Tuohy's history of organized crime in Chicago (M)

                                                         M


Merlo Mike Born 1880 Died November 8 1924. Born Michelangelo Merloi in Vizzini, Sicily. At the age of 9 he immigrated with his family to Chicago. He became involved in the Chicago chapter of the Unione Siciliana and became its president. Merlo worked with the Torrio mob to keep peace in Chicago between the various warring fraction, especially between Dion O’Bannion and his Northside gang and the unpredictable Genna brothers. However, Merlo died quickly and unexpectedly of cancer on November 8th, 1924. The underworld gave him spectacular send off, including $10,000 in floral arraignments and a $5,000 life size wax statue in his likeness, (Which was actually made before his death) His pallbearers included Mayor William E. Dever, State Attorney Robert E. Crowe, Chicago police chief Morgan A. Collins and the Cook County board president and future mayor, Anton J. Cermak. Shortly after his death, Dion O’Bannion was murdered and Chicago fell into a war like state that lasted for the next seven years.

Magnifichi Michael. bookmaker who is considered, by federal authorities to be a Made member of the Mafia. In 2002 he was arrested in the town of Roselle with William Daddano III, the grandson of Potatoes Daddano, a pimp and Capo who worked for Sam Giancana. They were with beating a man outside a restaurant. The case was later dismissed.  In 1999, the FBI identified Magnifichi as "obviously a rising 'star'" within the Chicago mob.

Manhattan Brewery: In Chicago, it was once owned by Capone. Its name was later changed to the Canadian Ace Brewery and was run by Alexander Greenberg, a one time Capone associate. The brewery was sold to Kansas City hood Tony Gizzo, a leading member of the Binaggio-Gargotta mob. Gizzo was later arrested for strong arming bars into buying Canadian Ace only.

Mayleo, Frank: Born 1913. A small time goon who survived on the edges of the outfit mostly as muscle man.

Maltese Frank J. AKA Baldy. Born 1930 Died of pancreatic cancer Oct 19, 1993.  In 1923, Al Capone, fleeing reformers in Chicago, all but invaded the city of Cicero and made it his own. Since then the city corruption has been breathtaking.  Officially, Baldy Maltese was a Cicero Illinois Republican Party leader and City Assessor and later Town President. Unofficially he was a life long bookmaker for the Outfit who answered directly to local boss Rocky Infelise. He was also involved with a large scale insurance fraud that stole millions for the city of Cicero over a three decade period. Everything he could do wrong, he did do wrong including using members of the police force to run illegal bingo games and using city phones to communicate with members of organized crime.
  In December 1986, Maltese was identified by the IRS as the leader of a massive gambling ring that was run out of, of all places, the Cicero town hall building. A raid on the property by the US Justice Department's Organized Crime Task Force on December 3, 1986 found gambling records and $100,000 cash.
   A second investigation by the IRS revealed that Maltese had made a $1,000,000 low interest loan to hood Paulie Spano. The money had been earmarked for commercial development in Cicero by the city Economic Development Commission
  Maltese pled guilty to federal conspiracy charges in 1993, but died before he could begin serving his sentence. His wife, Betty succeeded in office and was soon indicted (along with the former public safety director, former town treasurer and seven other people) on charges of diverting $10 million from the town's insurance program to their own pockets and using some of the money to buy a golf course in Wisconsin and a thoroughbred horse farm in Indiana. They also used some of the cash to buy themselves new Cadillac’s, a vacation home, remodel the city  golf course clubhouse to use as a private gambling resort and provide themselves with free life insurance. They all went to jail.

Matassa John Jr. AKA Pudgy. Matassa's father was a Chicago police officer and worked as a bodyguard/driver for Sam Giancana. (He was murder in 1975)
 The young Matassa joined the Northside crew and is said to be a made member of the Outfit and, according to Lenny Patrick, answered to Vince Solano. Matassa is thought to have some connection with National Consolidated Industries, Limited located at 505 North Shore Drive in Chicago, which is run by his cousin, Tommy Matassa.(The two live near each other in Park Ridge Ill.)  NCI provides optical services to the Laborers' Union. One hood testified that when he was appointed President of Health Marketing, Inc, which provided health services to the Laborers' Union, he would pay cash kick-backs to John and Tom Matassa, and John Serpico. He said that he would write company checks drawn on the NCI account in the amounts of approximately $2,000, $3,000 or $5,000 and then other employees of the company would cash the checks and return the cash to him and he would split the cash with Matassa and Solano. Matassa also has control over several pornographic book stores on the near north side of Chicago. (He and his cousin owned Cupboard on Hubbard, at 109 W. Hubbard on Chicago's Near North Side.)  His father's cousin Michael Glitta ran the pornography industry for the mob. Matassa was a vice president of the Laborers' Union Chicago District Council. He was tossed out due to his organized crime connections. At that point Matassa told a union hearing officer in 1997 that organized crime "doesn't exist. I don't believe there is a mob in Chicago."

Motor World West Hotel:  A 117 room motel in Forest View. Since 1965, the property was a sink hole for hundreds of thousands of dollars in Teamster pension funds money, borrowed originally by Sam Rantis, a syndicate front man. Rantis borrowed $650,000 from the teamsters to purchase the motel, which was worth only $450,000 at the time and was losing money.  He defaulted on the loan. The real owners of the motel were thought to be Manny Skar, Mario DiStefano and Tom Potenza.   Rantis disappeared in 1973 and was later found in 1974, shot dead and stuffed into a car parked at O’Hara airport.  The motel suddenly exploded into flames and burned to the ground on August 18, 1977

Messino Chris. AKA Dick A former Chicago police officer, in a 1983 the Illinois Attorney General Office and the Chicago Crime Commission, Messino identified Messino as a lieutenant in Albert Caesar Tocco south suburban crew. Messino and his Clem left Chicago police department after they were indicted in 1974 for taking part in an auto theft ring. Clem was later convicted, along with mobsters Thomas Covello and Joe Scalise, of running a chop shop.  Messino was sentenced to life in prison after he was convicted in 1995 of working with his brother, Clement Messino, another former Chicago police officer, in selling dozens of pounds of cocaine from 1980 to 1991.However the convictions were overturned when an appeals court decided the jury selection process in their cases was flawed. Clement Messino was convicted at a retrial but the jury deadlocked on the drug charge against his older brother, Christopher, while convicting him of tax evasion and acquitting him of obstruction of justice.

Morgano Bernard AKA Snooky In 1991, Morgano went on trial with Dominick "Tootsie" Palermo, Nicholas "Nicky" Guzzino, Sam Nuzzo Jr. Peter "Cadillac Pete" Petros and Sam "Frog" Glorioso for conspiring to shake down illegal gambling operations for a cut of the action. Morgano’s father Gaetano "Tommy" Morgano took over leadership of Northwestern Indiana from Frankie LaPorte who ruled there in the 1950s. However, Tommy Morgano was deported in 1963 by the Kennedy Justice Department. His place was taken by Frankie “Nicky Boy” Zizzo. When Zizzo died, Snooky Morgano took over until his indictment and imprisonment in 1991. He was released in 1996, but the lost control over the area to the Chicago mob which opened the territory to virtually anyone who wanted to operate there and pay their street taxes to the outfit.  

Monteleone John AKA Johnny Apes Boss of Cicero. Died, natural causes, 2001. It appeared that Monteleone was being groomed to take over the Outfit as the bosses grew older and either died or were jailed with alarming frequency in the 1980s. Insulated and withdrawn, Monteleone’s criminal record included arrests in the 1960s for possession of burglary tools and theft. In 1986, he served four years in prison for criminal contempt after refusing to testify before a grand jury concerning a car bombing in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Earlier in his career he also rented himself out as a freelance collector for bookie and loan sharks but did most of his muscle work for Fifi Buccieri the powerful West Side extortionist whose juice operations and narcotics racket LaPietra would one day take over. The other four collectors Buccieri had working for him included Vito Spillone, John Fecarotta (Later murdered) and Jimmy and Angelo LaPietra. Eventually he fell in with Angelo Bruno’s crew on the Southwest Side (Just after the murder of Jimmy the Bomber Catuara) In 1994 Monteleone would take over management of the crew. The crew that Monteleone inherited was decimated by jailed leadership, informers and an increasingly aggressive and savvy Federal office crime strike force office. The crews area was vast, stretching from Chinatown to Chicago Heights and included everything from chop shop operations, illegal casino, hundred, perhaps even thousands of independent bookies, prostitution and narcotics. 
Like the LaPietra’s, Monteleone made Cicero his home base of operations and for a while kept the same offices, 5102 West 14th Street, the offices for the Kleen-Aire Exterminators & Sanitation company, a front company of which he was one of the officers. When Monteleone died of natural causes in January 2001, Chiaramonti, made his move to control his former rackets. He was dead within a month

Maywood Sportsmen Club: Headquarters for Joey “Dove Aiuppa crew in the late 1950s.

Malone, Mike: US Secret Service Officer:  Chief of the Secret Service Frank Wilson on Michael F. "Mysterious Mike" Malone who went under cover and infiltrated the Capone mob under the name "Michael Lepito" His testimony would be instrumental in bringing Capone to Justice. "I thought then, and still think, he was the greatest natural undercover worker the (US Secret) Service ever had...Mike could easily pass for Italian...or whom ever the occasion demanded.  He was actually "Black Irish" from Jersey City. During world war one he had been in a airplane crash, they he married the nurse that attended to him.  They had one child, a little girl who was killed by a truck at the age of three. After that Mike and his wife drifted apart. He went into under cover work for the government. And he seemed top lose interest in everything else. It became his total life"
   Malone was a good actor with an ability to blend into any background. He had a dark, Mediterranean look and spoke Italian. He took the name De Angelo. The federal government made major efforts to create a false identity for him as small-time Brooklyn racketeers.   As Al Capone was on his way to prison for income tax evasion, he spotted Special Agent Malone in the Elevator and said, "The only thing that fooled me was your looks, you look like a wop. You took your chances I took mine. I lost. Good luck Mike."

Maraglia, Jimmy: A Chicago mob related robber active in the 1990s

Miami Club: A mob Chicago casino active in the mid 1960s.

Mangano Lawrence: AKA Dago: Mangano grew up in Chicago’s "Patch" section, near Little Italy. His first arrest came in 1912 for pandering, otherwise Mangano seems to have avoided any long term jail sentences. He was also listed by the Chicago Crime Commission as a public enemy as early as 1923.  In 1928, when Chicago Police raided one of Mangano’s gambling dens, Mangano bombed a police captain’s house in retaliation. When Capone was locked in battle with the Aiello brothers, Mangano and Capone thug Phil D’Andrea called Dominic Aiello and warned him to leave town. When he didn’t, they shoot up his bakery.    Mangano later worked with Ralph Capone and Charles Fischetti in beer distribution for Capone mob Mangano was a suspect in the April 29 1931 murder of with Mike "The Pike" Heitler, a pimp left over from the days of the Levee. Mangano was seen with him, playing cards before Heitler’s charred remains were found. He was also suspect in the August 1 1931 murder of another pimp, Jake Zuta.  With the end of prohibition, the Chicago outfit and virtually every hood in Chicago turned their eyes to gambling. As a result, in the early 1940s, there was the standard mob bloodshed between wise guys who were trying to either dominate the racket or keep from being dominated.  On August 3, 1944, at 4 AM, Mangano had been out taking car of business. He was with his body guard Michael Pontillo, and a Rita Reyes, a friend of Pontillo’s. With business over, Mangano headed home.  When he realized he was being followed, Mangano pulled his car to the side of the road on Blue Island Avenue. He stepped out of the car, thinking he was being followed by a cop in search of a quick pay off. He was wrong. He was hit with over 200 shotgun pellets and five .45 caliber bullets and lived, at least for a while. When cop asked him who shot him he replied "If I knew I’d tell you," and later at the hospital told doctors "Put me to sleep." And then died.  It’s suspect that Mangano refused to cut the mob into his gambling operations at a time when the outfit was run bringing all gambling operation in the state under their control. Mangano balked.

Mission Hills Country Club: Sam Giancana’s golf club of choice. In the early 1960s, the clubs resident pro was Harry Pezzullo. Late one night in July of 1963, near midnight, Pezzullo got a call from Giancana who was agitated at having lost a pile of money in golf game that afternoon. He wanted to improve his swing. Giancana was told Pezzullo "Get your ass down to the club." When Pezzullo told his wife about the call, she responded   "Get your ass down there. I don't want 'em coming here."  Pezzullo arrived at the club early enough to watch Giancana arrive in a caravan of four black Cadillac’s.  The hood turned their cars headlights onto the course to allow Giancana and Pezzullo to watch their shots. After several hours, Giancana was tired and handed the pro what he thought was a hundred dollar bill. It tuned out to be a thousand dollar bill.

Money troubles: In the 1990s, the Calabrese brothers earned so much money from gambling and extortion that they ran out of places to hide the cash. Nick Calabrese stated that he once stuffed as much as $250,000 into a metal box and buried it at Williams Bay, Wis. When he dug up the money to check on it six months later, he found a disgusting mess inside the box, Nicholas Calabrese said. "All of the money was wet and stinking," he said. "We had to take the money out but the bills stuck together. It was mildewed. We tried to use cologne but it made the smell worse."

Mount Carmel Cemetery: AKA Boothill.  A Chicago’s Catholic cemetery in the western part of the Archdiocese of Chicago. The vast majority of persons buried there are Italian, but it also holds the gravesites of most of Chicago’s big name gangsters including Al Capone.

Morris Joe: Chief investigator of a intelligence unit of the Chicago police dubbed Scotland Yard, in the 1950s. Starting in Morris had  been painstakingly gathering data on Chicago gangsters and their political friends. His tactic: pick up a hoodlum, grill him, set him free, tail him. With the help of surveillances, wire taps and bugs, Morris filled five filing cabinets with intelligence on 600 "syndicate" mobsters, 8,000 lesser hoodlums, and a disturbing number of his fellow cops and assorted politicians. In 1954 the Cook County Democratic machine decided to drop Morris' patron and chief protector, Reform Mayor Martin Kennelly, in favor of County Clerk Richard J. Daley. During the campaign, Morris was tripped up as he tried to bug the hotel room of a suspect who had powerful connections with the county committee. Word got to Candidate Daley that Scotland Yard was working against him. Observed the Daily News: "Predictions were made . . . that the election of Mayor Daley would mean the disbanding of Scotland Yard."
 Police Commissioner Timothy O'Connor ordered the Scotland Yard office to cease work immediately, had it padlocked and guarded round the clock, reassigned the unit's officers. Complained Chicago's Crime Commission Director Virgil Peterson: "Now the police department is back where it was ten years ago as far as hoodlums are concerned."

Murphy, Edward: Born 1902. On March 24 1950 AKA Emmett Kearns of 5806 Mozart Street, an occasional silent partner of Dave Yaras and Lenny Patrick in West Side gambling rackets, was murdered in the gambling war that was rocking the 24th ward . Murphy was a former bank robber and member of the Danny McGeoghegan gang, . (Murphy and Patrick had been in prison together with McGeoghegan) He was probably killed for cutting into territory run by Jack Humpreys, AKA Jack Ryan, Murray Humpreys brother. Murphy’s body was found with four bullets hanging from a farmer’s fence in Hartsdale Ind. Police found a .38 in Murphy’s pocket. He had been shot twice through the back of the head and once in the lower back.  

Mundo, Joey: Chicago handbook operator, shot to death on mob orders 1944
Neri, Henry: The mayor of Northlake Illinois.  for trying to extort $70,000 out of a contractor who had built some apartments in Northlake. Judge Julius Hoffman convicted Neri, as well as “Joe Shine” Amabile, AKA Joe the freak[1], former Alderman Joe Drozd and Alderman Leo Shababy, calling them “sickening spectacle” and gave them each 12 years, but his decision was over turned by US Circuit court judge Otto Kerner, the former Illinois Governor and United States Attorney. Joining him in the opinion were Judges Walter Cummings and Elmer Schnackenberg. They reversed Hoffman on the grounds that he had refused to ask the jurors if they had read newspaper articles about the defendants before the trial. Neri, Palermo and Shababy were tried again and this time entered guilty please before the trial.  It was the governments first stand against mob control of the Chicago circuit courts and gave backing to brave men like Hoffman who would stand up to the mob.

Moore, Winston: AKA  Buddha. Jail warden, born in New Orleans in 1928. Moore ran the Cook County jail when Sam Giancana was incarcerated there in the early 1960s. When Giancana’s mother died, Moore intervened with the judge to allow Giancana to attend the funeral for no other reason than he thought a son should a attend a mothers burial. When Giancana's lawyer told Moore that the crime wanted to return the favor, Moore replied that he was having trouble booking musical acts for the jail. That year, Aretha Franklin, Liza Minnelli, B.B. King and Johnny Cash appeared to perform at the jail.

Murders:  From 1919 until the year 2000, there were 1,111 gangland slayings in the Chicago area. From 1920 through 1993, there were a total of 14 conviction in mob slaying conducted in those years.
1919-'29....546
'30-'39....271
'40-'49....73
'50-'59....49
'60-'69....69
'70-'79....64
'80-'89....31
'90-'99....7
2000-'05....1

Meadowmoor Dairies. “Since 1926,” Murray Humpreys explained, “Capone has been trying to diversify his investments in legitimate business even while consolidating his brewing and distilling concerns, and that’s why he’s opening a retail dairy business.”
They told Sumner that Capone wanted him to keep the dairy union free. If he did that, they promised, they would allow him to invest in the deal. When Sumner refused the offer, Humphrey told him: “Your union has a million dollars in the treasury. I will hand you a hundred thousand dollars cash today. All you have to do is walk away. Leave town. I’ll take over from here.” Sumner, who was 81, said: “Out of the question.”
As soon as the hoods left, Sumner ordered sheet metal and bulletproof glass put up around the headquarters and his home and had bulletproof glass installed in his car, armed his chauffeur and hired bodyguards. The Hump left Sumner alone and instead went after the union’s president, Robert “Old Doc” Ritchie, and kidnapped him off the streets in late December of 1931. With Ritchie under wraps, they called Sumner and demanded $50,000 for Ritchie’s freedom. Sumner paid. “I handed,” he said, “Murray Humphreys fifty thousand dollars cash, in December. Two months later, on February 23, 1932, Meadowmoor Dairies Incorporated was charted with fifty thousand dollars cash.”
The dairy opened three months before Capone went to prison, on May 4, 1932. It was located at 1334 South Peoria street. Its representative on record was Billy Parrillo, brother to the future congressman. The Hump was later accused, by the IRS, of withholding taxes on the $50,000 extorted out of Sumner. He pled guilty and paid the taxes on the money. Four years later, in November of 1936, Cook County States Attorney Investigator, Tubbo Gilbert, was indicted for helping the Teamsters fix milk retail prices in Chicago. By that time, the Chicago teamsters were little more than an extension of the Chicago mob. The scandal involved Dr. Herman Bundesen of the Chicago board of health, as well as officials of local 753 of the Milk Drivers Union. The indictment read that they had conspired to fix the amount of milk delivered in the city to squeeze the smaller distributors out of the business, leaving only Meadowmoor Dairies.
Despite a mountain of evidence, the case went nowhere. States Attorney Courtney refused to bring it to court and refused to allow Tubbo Gilbert to resign. “If many people feel,” he said, “that politics has entered into this, then I won’t disagree with that conclusion.” It’s also interesting to note that a few years after the price fixing scandal died away, Murray Humphreys managed to drive most of his competitors in the dairy business out of the market by having the City of Chicago require all milk distributors to date their product, a practice now required of all meat, fish and dairy distributors across the country.
Al Capone was fascinated with the milk business. "Do you know," he would say, "they got a bigger markup in legit fresh milk than we could ever get away with in booze? Honest to God boys, we been in the wrong racket all along."
     So, in a manner of speaking, the boys entered the milk business. In the spring of 1931, Murray Humphreys, Capone's leading hood, Frankie Diamond, a thug and Diamond's brother, Johnny Maritote, who was married to Capone's sister, Mafalda, went to see Steve Sumner, the business agent for the teamster local 753 of the Milk Wagon drivers.
     In the meeting, the Hump told Sumner that Capone wanted his help in building Meadowmoor Dairies. "Since 1926," the Hump explained, "Capone has been trying to diversify his investments in legitimate business even while consolidating his brewing and distilling concerns, and that's why he's opening a retail dairy business."
     They told Sumner that Capone wanted him to keep the dairy union free. If he did that, they promised, they would allow him to invest in the deal.
     When Sumner refused the offer, Humphreys told him: "Your union has a million dollars in the treasury. I will hand you a hundred thousand dollars cash today. All you have to do is walk away. Leave town. I'll take over from here."
     Sumner, who was 81, said: "Out of the question."
     As soon as the hoods left, Sumner ordered sheet metal and bulletproof glass put up around the headquarters and his home and had bulletproof glass installed in his car, armed his chauffeur and hired bodyguards.
     The Hump left Sumner alone and instead went after the union's president, Robert "Old Doc" Ritchie, and kidnapped him off the streets in late December of 1931.
     With Ritchie under wraps, they called Sumner and demanded $50,000 for Ritchie's freedom. Sumner paid. "I handed," he said, "Murray Humphreys fifty thousand dollars cash, in December. Two months later, on February 23, 1932, Meadowmoor Dairies Incorporated was charted with fifty thousand dollars cash."
     The dairy opened three months before Capone went to prison, on May 4, 1932. It was located at 1334 South Peoria street. Its representative on record was Billy Parrillo, brother to the future congressman.
     The Hump was later accused, by the IRS, of withholding taxes on the $50,000 extorted out of Sumner. He pled guilty and paid the taxes on the money.
     Four years later, in November of 1936, Cook County States Attorney Investigator, Tubbo Gilbert, was indicted for helping the Teamsters fix milk retail prices in Chicago. By that time, the Chicago teamsters were little more than an extension of the Chicago mob.
     The scandal involved Dr. Herman Bundesen of the Chicago board of health, as well as officials of local 753 of the Milk Drivers Union. The indictment read that they had conspired to fix the amount of milk delivered in the city to squeeze the smaller distributors out of the business, leaving only Meadowmoor Dairies.
     Despite a mountain of evidence, the case went nowhere.
     States Attorney Courtney refused to bring it to court and refused to allow Tubbo Gilbert to resign. "If many people feel," he said, "that politics has entered into this, then I won't disagree with that conclusion."
     It's also interesting to note that a few years after the price fixing scandal died away, Murray Humphreys managed to drive most of his competitors in the dairy business out of the market by having the City of Chicago require all milk distributors to date their product, a practice now required of all meat, fish and dairy distributors across the country.

Mellon, Andrew:  St. Valentine's Day Massacre and the subsequent world wide publicity it brought, forced the federal government to take action against Capone. Several days after being sworn into office, President Herbert Hoover directed Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon to “Do something about this Capone fellow” That same morning, Mellon commissioned a team to get the necessary evidence to prove income tax evasion and to amass enough evidence to prosecute Capone successfully for Prohibition violations.  Once the evidence was collected, the Treasury agents were to work with the U.S. Attorney, George E. Q. Johnson to initiate prosecution of Capone and the key members of his organization.

Morzullo, Vito: A 25th ward Alderman who worked with the mob through the late 1950s. In 1963, Giancana replaced him without consulting with Accardo or Ricca which caused a minor flap in the organization.

Martin Big Jim: The Chicago Outfit’s effort to take over policy gambling was not confined to the South Side of Chicago. A large African-American community also existed on the City’s West Side. First settled at the turn of the century, over six thousand blacks lived along Lake Street by 1920.171 This area continued to
grow until the 1970’s when most of the West Side of Chicago became entirely
black. “Big Jim” Martin ran policy on the West Side from his tavern in the
1900 block of West Lake Street.172 On October 1, 1940, the Outfit planted a
bomb at Martin’s resort and made a demand for $20,000.173 Martin reportedly
ignored the demand because he was also the political leader of the West Side
black community. Martin’s operations were centered in the 28th Ward, home
of Democratic powerhouse Pat Nash. The Outfit eventually made Martin the same offer that they had made the Jones brothers. When Martin refused to switch allegiance to the Outfit, he was shot on November 15, 1950.4 The assailant was future mob boss
John P. “Jackie” Cerone. Left for dead, Martin recovered and following the
example of the Jones brothers left Chicago. It appears that the political protection
that Martin once held was gone. George Kells, the Wards Alderman had
resigned citing the ill health of his wife. His wife’s problems stemmed from
the threatening telephone calls that she had received from syndicate gangsters
suggesting that it was ill advised for her husband to seek reelection.
Teddy Roe was the one man left who held firm against the mob.

Marcus Leon: 6824 Clyde Ave. Born 1896. In about 1953, capo Willie Potatoes  Daddano was running prostitutes out of the River Road Motel in Rosemont. In about 1956, Sam Giancana purchased the hotel through the Southmoor Bank for a $100,000 payment.    Giancana changed the name of the motel to the Thunderbolt, dumped a pile of cash into its renovation, tossed out the hookers and, more or less, turned the place into a legitimate operation and gave standing orders that the place was off limits to anything unlawful.   In 1957, a banker named Leon Marcus, who handled much of Giancana's near legitimate investments, was indicted for embezzling bank funds. Stupidly, Marcus tried to blackmail Giancana into fixing his trial, if he didn't he would tell the IRS about the $100,000 c ash payment for the Thunderbolt and a series of other investments Giancana had made through him.    Giancana passed the order down to Willie Daddano who in turn sent an ex-Park police cop named Sal Moretti (born 1925) to murder Marcus and retrieve the $100,000 cash bill of sale from the banker’s wallet. Moretti invited three of his friends along to sit in hi s car and watch as he executed Marcus, leaving behind the bill of sale for the Thunderbolt.    On Saint Patrick’s day, March 17 Willie Potatoes had Moretti taken to Caton Farm Road in southwest Chicago, tortured and shot through the head and then stuffed into a dry cleaning bag and then shoved into the trunk of his own Chevy.    Moretti's pockets were turned inside out and only a metal pocket comb was left on the body, a warning to others in the outfit that when they were sent out on a job they were to go over every detail with a fine tooth comb. The only reason the cops found it was that the body started to decompose and the smell from the car was overwhelming enough to draw the neighborhoods attention. The cops found the marker on Marcus body and now there was hell to pay. Moretti's death was the 976 mob killing since Johnny Torrio had arrived to the windy city in 1919.    In October of 1962, Giancana's half brother, who was also the hotels managers, followed his brother’s orders and sold the hotel for $500,000. The deal was financed by Sam Giancana and one of the buyers was Mayor Donald Stephans.   Stephens also acknowledged that he had purchased a motel from Giancana, but, he said, he had only purchased the place to get Giancana out of town….this was seven years into Stephans 45 year administration.

Marcello, Sam: A wealthy mob loan shark. The outfit would kill him for reasons unknown on July 6, 1974.

Maritote Frank: AKA Frankie Diamond. 4144 West 5th Ave. Died August 21 1954. A one time body guard, and Brother-in-Law to Al Capone he was murdered in 1954, on mob orders, for reasons unknown although police suspected that he had cheated the mob out of gambling receipts. In 1936 Maritote was granted custody of his two-year-old daughter Francine after the child’s mother, Rose, was spotted in the company of Joe Vital an arsonist murderer. (Maritote also had a son, Roger and two other daughters)  In the 1940s he was dragged into the Bioff-Hollywood scandal. Maritote was murdered in an ambush not far from his home. Suspected in the killing were “Milwaukee Phil” Aldersio, Marshall Caifano, and Albert Frabotta. Joey Glimco, who was seldom questioned in any murders was also called in by police. Maritote’s estate included vast real estate holdings in Lake County, four currency exchange companies, two cab companies, a handbook, and ice cream factory an exterminating firm and seven apartment buildings.

McGovern’s Saloon and CafĂ©: Originally based on the North Clark Street, McGovern’s Saloon and Cafe, was the first home of the Northsider gang under Dion O’Bannion.

Meo’s: Paul Ricca’s favorite restaurant where most of his meetings were held in the late 1950s. The owner, Albert Meo was  born in Chicago 1931 In 1957, Sam Giancana placed the Meo Brothers in charge of a massive suburban casino he owned called the Villa Venice Milwaukee avenue in rural Wheeling The club exploded in a ball of fire for unexplained reasons on March 4, 1967. The insurance claim was handled through John D’Arco company, Anco Insurance.

Migratory Bird Act: When Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy ordered a crack down on the Chicago mob, FBI agents arrested Capo and future Mob Boss Joey Aiuppa for possessing too many birds out of season.  Agents raided the mobster’s house and searching the freezer found that he had 56 frozen Doves. The agents charged him under the US Migratory Bird Act which allows citizens to have only 24 Doves per person. From that day on, Aiuppa was dubbed “Joey Doves”

Miss Chicago: In December 1945, gangster Rocco Fischetti was living with a former Miss Chicago beauty pageant winner. After an argument, the gangster ordered her to leave the apartment. When she refused, he tore her clothes off, beat her and tossed her out on to Michigan Avenue naked.

McCullough, Robert Larris: A one time Capone labor terrorist and strong arm man, McCullough served as chief of security at the mob owned Miami Beach Kennel Club and the Sportsman's Park near Cicero, Ill. On April 7, 1925, McCullough was arrested at a raid that netted John Patton, Joe Fusco, Frank Nitti, and others. During the raid police recovered records which revealed that Torrio, John Patton, Capone, and Jack Guzik, together with others, were operating an efficient illegal organization which was engaged in operations netting millions of dollars a year.

Moy Willie: Willie Moy was a big shot in Chicago's enormous, and growing Chinese community, or at least he was until 1991 when federal prosecutors convicted Moy of tax conspiracy. The charges stemmed from a 1986 raid on a Chinese mob casino, run by the so-called On Leong faction, which was netting the gang about two million dollars.
     According to former Chicago lawyer turned mob informant Robert Cooley, Moy and another man gave him $100,000, to pass on to former First Ward Alderman Fred Roti and Pat Marcy. Marcy was the legendary mobbed-up secretary of the First Ward Democratic Organization and made member of the Mafia who came to power under Tony Accardo and Sam Giancana. Moy wanted Marcy to "influence" the outcome of a 1981 murder case in the Cook County Circuit Court.
     The On Leong had been active in Chicago, as long as the Mafia, perhaps even longer. Established in 1880, it was set up as a benevolent association, intended to help Chinese immigrants in Chicago.
     But, by 1900 it was known to be running rigged gambling casinos all over the Windy City's original Chinatown located between Polk Street and Congress. Later on the gang, and large numbers of Chinese flowed down to 22nd Street, the old vice section known as the Levee. When that closed, the group followed Chicago underworld characters to the South Side.
     Today, the On Leong is at an all time high, flush with cash and power, although it still lacks the political and police clout that the Chicago Mafia holds. The gang is active in money laundering, on an international basis and works closely with Chinese gangs in the Asian mainland, mostly in counterfeiting, computer software theft and smuggling illegal goods into the U.S.
     The Asian based traffickers in human cargo, the so-called "snakeheads," work on a $15,000 commission. For that money, they smuggle an illegal alien into the United States with a vague promise of employment waiting them at the end of the journey. Of course, there isn't any and most of these immigrants end up as slave labor in restaurants or brothels.
     Chicago's other oriental gangster of note is a Japanese born gambler whose testimony in a number of other mob cases helped to put a lot of hoods away for life. Eto is currently in the Federal Witness Protection Program. He entered the program after the outfit sent a hitman out to shoot the Bookie dead, but he goofed the job up. Eto lived and now he's telling the Feds everything they want to know.
     One of the men that Eto's testimony helped to send away was Frankie Breeze Calabrese. Eto was into Frankie Breeze for $10,000 in juice loans in 1983, which he was forced to pay back at 5% interest a week.
     In 1981, Ken Eto made a series of monthly $ 1,000 payments to John Monteleone through Infelise and Marino. These payments were to buy police protection from the Vice Control Division of the Chicago Police Department for Eto's monte game.   Eto died of natural causes in Georgia in 2005 

Miss Kate Adams Rescue Home: A temporary hotel for Levee prostitutes who fled the red light district. Established in 1912. The women were given a week’s free stay plus meals

Mesi James: 911 North Pulaski Road. One of the Mesi brothers. In 1952, Mesi, a republican was trying to unseat 34th ward committeeman Charlie Gross who refused to drop out of the republican primary. (Gross, although shot dead, won the election anyway)  He was eventually shot at 1336 North Kedzie. Police suspected that Sam Mesi was controlled by gangster Charlie Gioe who technically worked for a Mesi owned company, The Gem Dye and Mold Company on 2411 Claybourn street. Also working at the company, or at least on the payroll were  Hoodlum Alfred Perkins and Nicky DeJohn (Later murdered by the mob in 1947 in San Francisco)

Mesi, Phil: Born 1900. 1163 Grand Ave. In 1959, Mesi, primarily a big money gambler was paid $472.00 a month by the Chicago of Chicago to “Supervise” three city garbage trucks. Mesi, who admitted to an income of $800,000.00 a year from only one of the several gambling houses he owned, went on the city payroll through patronage. Mesi’s record with the Outfit went back to the Capone days when he was indicted (and released) four times for murder. On May 18 1919, Mesi was sentenced to a year in prison for robbery. From 1925 through 1954, he was arrested eight times as a thief, handbook operator and suspected killer of Joe Adducci, in 1934. Adducci was getting at shave at the time and the killer lifted the hot towel from his face to make sure they had their man.
A witness in the murder, Sebastian Sapienza, was later murdered while under police protection. Mesi was a yearly guest to Tony Accardo’s famous Fourth of July Party thrown on his massive residential lawn each year. Mesi explained that he wasn’t hiding his patronage position “With a record like mine you can’t hide. The city knew all about it when they hired me” He was sponsored in the position by city Alderman Mathew Bieszezat. Phil and his brother Sam were both questioned in the Gross murder.

Mesi Sam: 1136 Grand Ave. Brother of syndicate gambler Phil Mesi. Like his brother, Sam was also a big numbers gambler and like his brother, held a Chicago City patronage position. On November 12, 1952 police received a tip about a handbook Mesi was running at 916 North Harding Ave. When they arrived, the cops found a key to the door under a foot mat and let themselves in. Inside, the arrested Mesi, Jimmy Alterie and Frankie Nedza. The three men were surrounded by betting slips and banks of phones.    

Maritote, Frank: A hood sentenced to prison with Willie Bioff in the Hollywood shakedown scandal. Maritote’s brother John (born 1917 resides at 10924 Artesian Ave.) worked for the Chicago film projectionists union. 

McDonnell, Robert J. Born 1922. 1246 Franklin Street,  River Forest. McDonnell was a mob lawyer for a short time in the mid 1960s. In 1966, he was indicted and eventually jailed for his role in a mob scam to pass $14,000 in fake money orders across state lines. Arrested with McDonnell was Rocky Infelice, America Di Pietto, Jimmy The Cowboy Mirro, and burglar Frankie Santucci.  McDonnell’s odd behavior in court (Yelling to the judge “No matter what you sentence me, what matter”) had him sent to a mental hospital for examination. The hospital reported back McDonnell was completely convinced that he was innocent and had done nothing wrong. 

Martin, James: A former power on the west side policy business in the 1940s until the mob drove him out of the city and into Maywood.

Mead, William E. 909 Glenwood Ave. Joliet. A one time public health and safety commissioner in Joliet in the 1940-50s, he was considered little more than a mob due.
 
Modrow, Gertrude: Born 1913. Died 1932. Modrow, only five foot two inches tall, was a seemingly lost 19 year old girl.. Her father was in a state run mental asylum and her mother was already dead leaving Gertrude to fend for herself. She found work as a housemaid in Oak Park and then fell in with the 42 gang. On December 26, 1932, he body was found dumped along a road in DuPage County, shot to death. Powder burns on her dress showed she had been shot through the back. The bullet went through her rib cage and then through her arm. After she was dumped from the car, two more bullets were fired into her head. Her body was draped in expensive jewelry. Police suspected that Gertrude was pregnant and confronted the child’s father, a member of the 42 gang, who took her for a ride and killed her.          




[1] In the mid 1960s Amabile and Rocco Pranno were both sentenced to 15 years in prison for extortion 

No comments: