Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***



 The P73 Playwriting Fellowship
The P73 Playwriting Fellowship provides a year of comprehensive support to one early-career playwright who has not received a professional production in New York City (please see eligibility requirements below). Through this program, Page 73 provides artistic and financial resources to this writer as he or she develops one or more new plays of his or her choosing. The P73 Playwriting Fellow receives an unrestricted award of $10,000 and a development budget, managed by Page 73 and the Fellow over the course of the Fellowship year, up to an additional $10,000.

***

2017 is the inaugural year of The Future Is Female Festival, a national festival with 22 outposts across the United States. As the only in MPLS, Pretty Shrew Productions invites female-identified playwrights of all intersecting identities to create short plays on the subject “the future is female” and what that looks like and/or means to them. The Future Is Female Festival: MPLS will consist of five plays to be performed as staged readings with professional actors from the Twin Cities at the Playwrights' Center. Selected playwrights will receive a monetary prize for their contribution.

***

Left Coast Theatre Co. seeks 10- to 15-Minute Plays of any genre (comedy, drama, etc.) that relate to the theme listed below. We encourage innovative/humorous/surprising scripts that address the following:
THE MORNING AFTER
Left Coast Theatre Co. returns to its roots with “The Morning After,” an anthology of original LGBTQ shorts. This year we are looking for plays that address big moments we experience in life: weddings, funerals, breakups, proposals, birthdays, coming out. But sometimes it’s the morning after that really changes our lives. We are looking for shorts that showcases the hilarity, the joy, the grief, the angst, and the uncertainty of the morning after the big event.


*** FOR MORE INFORMATION about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** CASTING & PLAYWRIGHTS ***

Question: How involved are you in the casting of your plays and are there special 
qualities an actor needs to be successful in your plays?

Answer

I get involved in casting – and all other aspects of the production – when the play is having its world premiere and its Broadway (or West End) production. As far as casting goes, all playwrights have casting approval all the time under the standard playwrights’ contract which was negotiated back in the 1930s. So I have a right to pick the cast. As a practical matter, I share that right with the director and the producer, because if we’re not all in agreement, there will be problems down the line.

I take casting extremely seriously. It’s about 80-90% of the ball game as far as production is concerned. If you don’t cast a show well, it will never succeed, no matter how well everything else works. What I look for in actors is charm, inventiveness and, above all, technique. If they don’t have the skills at their fingertips, they’re unlikely to develop them during rehearsals.

More…

***

It’s inarguable that the subjectivity and malleability of theater across productions may be one of its most beautiful and singular qualities. However, it’s also inarguable that sometimes, despite the notion that there’s no one “right” way to do something, certain “experiments” can end up going wrong. The Root has published playwright Katori Hall’s response to the fact that her play, The Mountaintop — a fictionalized portrait of Martin Luther King, Jr. on the night before his assassination — was performed at Kent State University with a white actor in the role of the leader of the civil rights movement.

As Playbill notes, the play was first produced in London, where it starred David Harewood; it then had a run on Broadway, where Samuel L. Jackson made his Broadway debut playing MLK (Angela Bassett co-starred). Jackson and Harewood are, you may note, black. Since the play’s 2009 premiere, it has garnered the interest of many regional and smaller theaters elsewhere in the country (for example, there was a production at the famed Guthrie in Minneapolis in 2014, and it’s currently at the Dallas Theater Center). In these, Martin Luther King, Jr. has also, as would be expected, played by black actors. In fact, even in Russia (as the playwright noted in the response to the Kent State production on The Root) “where black actors are scarce, the theater moved mountains to cast two black actors for the reading.”

More…

***

However, Selma’s biggest concern is with the clause which gives playwrights right of approval of the choice of actors, directors and some other members of the creative team. She suggests that this means that writers “have the right to decide what the design looks like”, which it very precisely doesn’t: it means that the producer, director and writer should agree on a designer they all trust. There is a caveat in all the agreements requiring the writer to give due consideration to the company’s resources (in the TNC agreement it’s the company’s artistic requirements, financial resources, casting and company policies, and custom and practice). The scenario of a writer turning down everybody whom the theatre offers is possible but would be a dramatic own goal ‑ for that reason, it’s never happened. The clause does not give the writer “the lion’s share of power and control over the creation of work”; all it does is to allow playwrights (it’s a right, not an obligation) to contribute meaningfully to a conversation which other people will already be having about how their play will first be presented to the public. The alternative to spreading a little power to the writer is to keep it with the director. The alternative to being allowed into a conversation is not a collaborative utopia: it’s being kept out.

More...

***

For a long time, it appeared that Albee, a longtime New Yorker, would direct “Marriage Play” himself - as he had almost all of its incarnations (one small Florida production credited a different director but Albee’s hand was evident even there.) Albee finally consented to let Houghton direct - but insisted on casting his favorites for both roles. For Signature, that meant a plane ticket from Los Angeles and a per diem for Klunis, something way out of line with the company’s usual expenses. It also meant a substantial concession to the playwright; the director traditionally has casting approval.

More...

***

Get more productions: how to be a playwright that directors want to work with

When the director asks you for your opinion on actors, give it. Be gracious and generous while still being truthful.

If you think and actor is completely wrong for the role that the director’s considering them for, say so. The director might cast that actor anyway, because they might know something about the actor that you don’t, or might see possibilities in the role that even you, the playwright, haven’t seen yet.

Another thing you should know is that if the theater has a company of actors, the director will cast most of the roles from that company, or even all of them. A director has a responsibility to keep developing and giving opportunities for the actors in the company.

Ultimately, the director has the final say on casting. Once you’ve given your feedback, trust the director to make the final choices.

More…

***

DRAMATISTS GUILD BILL OF RIGHTS

2. APPROVAL OF PRODUCTION ELEMENTS.

You have the right to approve the cast, director, and designers (and, for a musical, the choreographer, orchestrator, arranger, and musical director, as well), including their replacements. This is called "artistic approval."

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "NYCPlaywrights" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to 
nycplaywrights_group+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
To post to this group, send email to 
nycplaywrights_group@googlegroups.com.
Visit this group at 
https://groups.google.com/group/nycplaywrights_group.
For more options, visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


No comments: