Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***

*** PLAYWRIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES ***

As Sacramento’s leader of bold, thought-provoking theatre, Capital Stage created the PLAYWRIGHTS’ REVOLUTION. This series of staged readings seeks to identify and develop exciting new plays and playwrights. These new works are brought to theatrical life through a series of staged readings performed by professional actors in Capital Stage’s intimate theatre. Capital Stage invites audiences to take part in the new play development process by attending readings and participating in post-reading discussion.

***

Orlando Shakespeare Theater will be performing seven new plays for the PlayFest 2017 weekend, November 2–5, 2017. 
We look for scripts that are appropriate for our Goldman Theater, an intimate proscenium theater that seats 118. Typical cast size for the Goldman Theater is 1–8. 
We are especially interested in scripts that speak to the issues that our audiences are experiencing right now. Past PlayFest plays have dealt with issues of racism, autism, gender, Alzheimer's, immigration, etc. Our Shakespeare and classical productions deal with “timeless issues” and we like for our new plays to deal with modern “issues of our times.”

***

The MTB Audio Drama Scriptwriting Competition celebrates good old-fashioned storytelling with a $250 first prize and $100 second-place prize. All genres considered and authors retain all script rights. There’s no fee for entry. We simply ask the following:
Please keep to one entry per author.
The script should be your original work/story (no adaptations of another author’s works)
Please keep the script “family friendly”
1) Avoid incorporating swearing, which for this context includes “damn,” “hell,” “God” etc.
2) Avoid implicit or implied sexual context
Make sure your script is action/plot driven
Scripts should run no longer than 30 minutes


*** FOR MORE INFORMATION about these and other opportunities see the web site at http://www.nycplaywrights.org ***


*** PUPPET ARTISTS ARE HAVING A MOMENT ***

A shop vacuum became a lover; suction was involved. Feet turned into faces. A great fanged creature appeared with a man inside. Ghostly villagers assembled, silent and wreathed with smoke as their buildings burned and burned.

It was a puppet invasion — all part of the 11-day Chicago International Puppet Theater Festival — and the latest proof that puppetry, a delicate and mysterious art so often restricted in this country to the children’s table, or relegated to fringe productions, has claimed a spot closer to the center. In an age when we seek relief from the relentless barrage of technology, this low-fi, handmade form provides it.

More…

***

Hand to God is an "irreverent puppet comedy ...about a possessed Christian-ministry puppet."[2] Author Robert Askins said that "Hand to God is an expression about honesty. It’s a southern regionalism that’s fairly unknown in the North."[5]

In the devoutly religious, relatively quiet small town of Cypress, Texas, Margery is a widow whose husband has recently died. To keep her occupied, her minister, Pastor Greg, has asked her to run the puppet club. Fundamentalist Christian congregations often use puppets to teach children how to follow the Bible and avoid Satan. The teenage members of the club are her son Jason; Jessica, the girl next door that Jason has a crush on; and Timmy, the neighborhood troublemaker whose mother is attending Alcoholics Anonymous meetings at the church. Pastor Greg wants the puppet club to put on a performance at the church next Sunday. The characters become sexually attracted to each other. Jason's hand puppet, Tyrone, takes on a life of his own, announces that he is Satan, leads them into sin, and expresses secrets that the characters would rather have left unacknowledged.

More…

***

War Horse is a play based on the book of the same name by children's writer Michael Morpurgo, adapted for stage by Nick Stafford. Originally Morpurgo thought "they must be mad" to try to make a play from his best-selling 1982 novel; nonetheless, the play was a success.[1] The play's West End and Broadway productions are directed by Marianne Elliott and Tom Morris; it features life-size horse puppets by the Handspring Puppet Company of South Africa, with "horse choreography" by Toby Sedgwick.[2]

More…

***

They may have no legs of their own, but darned if those fuzzy creatures aren’t still standing, long after more full-bodied competition has bitten the dust. I mean the singing, occasionally foulmouthed hand puppets of “Avenue Q,” the “Sesame Street”-style musical for adults who can’t quite believe they’ve grown up, which reopened Off Broadway on Wednesday night at New World Stages, after a six-year, Tony Award-winning run on Broadway.

For showbiz old-timers who have been through many different dressing rooms since they first hit it big, they look and sound remarkably healthy, including the ones with green noses and the big, furry monster who spends all his time looking at porn on the Internet. And they — and their songs (by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx) and script (by Jeff Whitty) — remain surprisingly fresh (in all senses of the word), even for someone who, like me, has now spent many hours in their company.

More…

***

The Lion King: All you need to know about its puppets and masks

Tony Award-winning director and designer Julie Taymor, along with designer Michael Curry, hand sculpted and painted every prototype mask that now appears in the iconic “Circle of Life” opening of the show.

It took approximately 37,000 hours to build all the puppets and masks; which is over 1,542 days!

There are 232 puppets in the show, including rod, shadow and full-sized puppets. Some of these were even inspired by Japanese Bunraku puppetry.

With the masks, Taymor created what she calls “the double event” which enables the audience to see the characters as animal and human at the same time.

Mufasa’s mask weighs 11 ounces, Scar’s mask weighs seven ounces and Sarabi’s mask is just four ounces. The masks, along with many others used in the show, are extremely lightweight (just under one pound) and are comprised of silicone rubber (to form the mask imprint) with carbon graphite overlay - the same durable material used to build airplanes. Over 750 pounds of silicone rubber were used to make the masks.

More…

***

Sesame Street: Les Mousserables (Les Mis Parody)


***

Charlie Kaufman: why I wrote Being John Malkovich

I wrote Being John Malkovich while I was waiting for [the next sitcom] hiring season. My idea was that I would write a script and use it to get work. I had this idea that someone finds a portal into someone's head, and I had another idea that somebody has a story about someone having an affair with a co-worker. And neither one was going anywhere, so I just decided to combine them.

It got a really positive response. I started to get a little known. People would read it and tell me how funny it was, invite me for meetings, tell me nobody would ever make the movie. I had maybe 15 meetings like that, so I wasn't really expecting it to get made. Then it got to Spike Jonze, and he was in a position to get a movie made. I didn't really expect it to be anything. I don't think Spike did either. I remember it going to the Venice film festival, which was the first exposure it had. I wasn't invited, but they went: Spike and Cameron Diaz and Catherine Keener. I just got a phone call saying that it was this big thing, and then all these articles got written about it. It was exciting.

More…

***

Being John Malkovich, Dance of Despair and Disillusionment

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "NYCPlaywrights" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to nycplaywrights_group+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.

No comments: