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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC
  


JITNEY 

1: A SMALL BUS THAT CARRIES PASSENGERS OVER A REGULAR ROUTE ON A FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE

 2: AN UNLICENSED TAXICAB

IN THE EARLY 1900s, JITNEY WAS SLANG FOR "NICKEL," BUT IT WASN'T LONG BEFORE THE TERM WAS APPLIED TO A NEW MODE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION THAT ONLY COST A NICKEL. WHEN THEY WERE INTRODUCED IN AMERICAN CITIES AT THE BEGINNING OF THE CENTURY, VEHICULAR JITNEYS COULD BE ANY AUTOMOBILES THAT CARRIED PASSENGERS OVER A SET ROUTE FOR A CHEAP FARE, BUT EVENTUALLY THE TERM WAS APPLIED SPECIFICALLY TO SMALL BUSES—AND, NOWADAYS, TO THE MOTOR SHUTTLES USED BY AIRLINES AND HOTELS). IN THE MID-1900S, THE WORD JITNEY WAS COMBINED WITH JEEP TO CREATE A NEW COINAGE: JEEPNEY, MEANING "A PHILIPPINE JITNEY BUS CONVERTED FROM A JEEP."



FACTITIOUS 

 1: PRODUCED BY HUMANS RATHER THAN BY NATURAL FORCES

 2FORMED BY OR ADAPTED TO AN ARTIFICIAL OR CONVENTIONAL STANDARD

LIKE THE COMMON WORDS FACT AND FACTUAL, FACTITIOUS ULTIMATELY COMES FROM THE LATIN VERB FACERE, MEANING "TO DO" OR "TO MAKE." THE MOST IMMEDIATE ANCESTOR OF FACTITIOUS IS THE LATIN ADJECTIVE FACTICIUS, MEANING "MADE BY ART" OR "ARTIFICIAL." WHEN ENGLISH SPEAKERS FIRST ADOPTED THE WORD AS FACTITIOUS IN THE 17TH CENTURY, IT MEANT "PRODUCED BY HUMAN EFFORT OR SKILL" (RATHER THAN ARISING FROM NATURE). THIS MEANING GAVE RISE TO SUCH MEANINGS AS "ARTIFICIAL" AND "FALSE" OR "FEIGNED."



HABERDASHER 

 1: (BRITISH) A DEALER IN NOTIONS (SUCH AS NEEDLES, THREAD, BUTTONS, ETC.)

2: A DEALER IN MEN'S CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES

AT VARIOUS TIMES THROUGHOUT ITS HISTORY, THE TERM HABERDASHER HAS REFERRED TO A DEALER OF HATS OR CAPS, A SELLER OF NOTIONS (SEWING SUPPLIES, SUCH AS NEEDLES AND THIMBLES), AND APPARENTLY (PERHAPS SOMEWHAT COYLY) TO A PERSON WHO SELLS LIQUOR. NOWADAYS, WITH HATS NOT BEING AS FASHIONABLE AS THEY ONCE WERE, THE WORD MOSTLY IS APPLIED GENERALLY AS A CLOTHING OUTFITTER FOR MEN, WITH HABERDASHERY REFERRING TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OR THE GOODS SOLD THERE. HABERDASHER DERIVES VIA MIDDLE ENGLISH FROM HAPERTAS, AN ANGLO-FRENCH WORD FOR A KIND OF CLOTH, AS DOES THE OBSOLETE NOUN HABERDASH, WHICH ONCE MEANT PETTY MERCHANDISE OR SMALL WARES.



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