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John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

THE IRISH IN POLITICS by John William Tuohy




"No, the Irish are not anarchists, they are however, a political and economic threat, and this is why we fear them" A New Yorker, 1846

(To the Irish)....an election is not the decision of a great impartial jury, but a struggle between the " in's" and the" outs" those who vote the same way are "friends". To scratch, or to bolt is to "go back on your friends". Places and contracts are "the spoils". The official’s first duty is to find berths for his supporters" Edward Ross

"So it was on one evening that a candidate received the endorsement when his supporters arrived just in the nick of time to save the chairman from going out the window and the secretary following him as well" Minutes from Irish-Democratic Party meeting in New York, 1910

"The nomination of Fernando Wood and Mr. Hoffman, neither of whom has a drop of Irish blood in his veins, for Mayor of a city, three fourth of whose Democratic voters are Irish, is an insult to the honor of the ould sod, which every true Irish Democrat will avenge, if he is not lost to all sense of the glory of the land that bore him......awake slumbering sons of old Ireland and given us such a demonstration for the affections for those Irish names and blood as will command the respect of those miscreants.....Why not elect an Irish Mayor on an exclusively Irish tickets, with a shillelagh and a short rope, without the benefit of clergy, for the American that ventures to offer to vote for it ...Irishmen stand up for your rights and the Mayoralty is yours...nominate an Irishman, elect an Irishman….and then, when you call upon him in city hall, you've got an Irish Mayor as sure as there's never a snake nor a toad in Ireland" The New York Tribune"

"When you approach the polls, any person who addresses you as Irishman, or by any appellation but Carolinian or American, his language is distant and offensive. He is either ignorant or suppose you to be so, or has some sinister views. There is a bribery to the affections" Bishop John England 1817

"The trouble with these Irish, is that they do not seem to know, or will not recognize, that politics is not a religion and that their Catholic religion should not be the foundation of their political beliefs, there is, must be, a difference" Malcolm Cyrus

"I think that there has got to be, in every ward, in every city, somebody that any bloke can come to, no matter what he's done mind you, and get help...help you understand....none of your law and your Justice, but help." Boston's Martin Lomasney

"The Massachusetts of the Puritans is as dead as Caesar, but there is no need to mourn the fact. Their successors...the Irish...had letters and learning, culture and civilization when the ancestors of the Puritans were savages running half naked through the forest of Britain. It took the Irish to make Massachusetts a fit place to live in" James Michael Curley, in a letter to a member of the Harvard Board of Overseer.

(The Yankees) "got rich by selling opium to the Chinese, rum to the Indians, or trading in Slaves" James Michael Curley.

"Boston is a place where the Cabot's speak only to the Lowell's and the Lowell's speak only to God" New England Maxim
"Boston is a place where the Casey's speak only to the Curley's and the Curley's speak to whomever they damn well please" Curley's Maxim

"Several times that night, flying wedges of rowdies tried to crash our lines, but we plugged them as they came. John suffered a broken jaw, and my cohorts and I took a pounding, but when the clerks and the registrars arrived the next morning, we still held the fort, and my name topped the ballot. Years later, the law was changed, and the ballot position was determined by lot" Jim Curley on his successful election bid for Boston City Council in 1899. The top position on the ballot was prized because any uneducated voters simply voted for the first name they saw.

"I had no time for girlfriends, since I was kept busy serving as General Chairman of committees that organized picnics, outings, minstrel shows, church suppers and dances. As a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, I raised funds for welfare projects and went around the neighborhood visiting the sick and needy. James Curley

"I used to meet groups of unemployed and take them to city hall and employment agencies to find jobs for them. In the course of two years, I secured jobs for about seven hundred men and women, often finding it necessary to fill out job applications for them. I took others to the police station and the courts where I intervened on their behalf..."James Curley recalling his days as a member of the Boston City Council. A few years into service, he volunteered to take a civil service exam for a thick headed constituent. He was discovered and served 60 days in Jail. The sentence made him a Hero among the city ethnic working class, and a legend began.

"He did it for a friend" Curley's supporters response anytime Curley's civil service exam incident came up.

"Well, I just want to inform you that if you present such a motion, you will go through that (2nd floor) window" James Curley to the President of the City Council who planned to introduce a bill to have Curley banned from office because of the civil service exam incident.

"Their talents were comparable, but personally they were direct opposites. Fitzgerald had a pleasant tenor voice, whereas Curley never had been known to sing in public. (Fitzgerald) was affable, genial, friendly, the kind of person on whom a nickname was easily fastened. He was known throughout the city as Honey, Fitzy, John F. or the little General. He was short, quick, lively and bouncy, always smiling, dwarfed by the commanding height and personality of Curley. Curley had no nickname. Few persons ever called him Jim, except in print. He was always known as James Michael Curley, or merely Curley. Joseph F. Dinnen.

"Your nothing but a pack of second story workers (Burglars) milk bottle robbers and doormat thieves. I'll be elected Mayor of Boston and you don't like it. Here I am. Does any one of you bums want to step up here and make anything of it?" James Curley to a hostile crowd opposed to his election.

"He has not only joined a Masonic order, but he has also become a communicant of Fashionable Trinity (Protestant) Church" James Michael Curley baseless attack on his opponents religious practices. His opponent, a practicing Catholic spent most of the rest the campaign denying the charge.


"Murphy (Curley's opponent) intends to divorce his wife and marry a 16 year old girl"  Rumors spread by Curley men

"There are times, when, if you want to win an election, you must do unto others as they wish to do unto you, but you must do it first" James Michael Curley

"What, all three of them?" James Michael Curley when asked to comment on Republican Candidate Endicott Peabody Saltonstall.

"Jaime Miguel Curleo" James Michael Curley's name as an alternate Democratic delegate from Puerto Rico 1932.

"Senor's, Senorita's..."
Beginning of Curley's first speech upon his return from the National
Convention.

(I'll tell you the story of) the Back Bay maid who served a Thanksgiving Day dinner with one leg of the turkey missing. Fired when she explained that she had given it to the cop on the beat, she picked up the turkey by the other leg and threw it at the dowager who had called her "a dirty Irish pig”. ."I'm not fired" she said "I quit" James Michael Curley replying to a reporter’s question on how he felt about losing his bid for reelection in 1955

He was crooked, loyal, generous to a fault, to me, he typified all that was right and that was awful about the old fashioned Irish boss" Francis Perkins, Secretary of Labor under Governor Franklin Roosevelt on Big Tim Sullivan

Ronald Reagan, Republican Presidential Candidate: "If elected I will appoint a Woman to the Supreme Court, that is my commitment." Jerry Brown, lifelong bachelor and Democratic Presidential Hopeful: "That's not a commitment, I'll give you a commitment, if elected, I'll marry a woman"

"Thus smartened up, the Irish have become the most important people in America"       
                                                                                                             William Chambers

"No, the Irish are not anarchists, they are however, a political and economic threat, and this is why we fear them" A New Yorker, 1846

(To the Irish)..an election is not the decision of a great impartial jury, but a struggle between the "in's" and the" outs" those who vote the same way are "friends". To scratch, or to bolt is to "go back on your friends". Places and contracts are "the spoils". The official’s first duty is to find berths for his supporters" Edward Ross

"The nomination of Fernando Wood and Mr. Hoffman, neither of whom has a drop of Irish blood in his veins, for Mayor of a city, three fourth of whose Democratic voters are Irish, is an insult to the honor of the ould sod, which every true Irish Democrat will avenge, if he is not lost to all sense of the glory of the land that bore him......awake slumbering sons of old Ireland and given us such a demonstration for the affections for those Irish names and blood as will command the respect of those miscreants.....Why not elect an Irish Mayor on an exclusively Irish tickets, with a shillelagh and a short rope, without the benefit of clergy, for the American that ventures to offer to vote for it ?...Irishmen stand up for your rights and the Mayoralty is yours...nominate an Irishman, elect an Irishman….and then, when you call upon him in city hall, you've got an Irish Mayor as sure as there's never a snake nor a toad in Ireland" The New York Tribune

"Did you expect me to bring a pig and a shillelagh with me?" John McCall answering a society Matron at a party who showed surprise that he was an Irish American.

"When you approach the polls, any person who addresses you as Irishman, or by any appellation but Carolinian or American, his language is distant and offensive. He is either ignorant or suppose you to be so, or has some sinister views. There is a bribery to the affections" Bishop John England 1817


"The trouble with these Irish, is that they do not seem to know, or will not recognize, that politics is not a religion and that their Catholic religion should not be the foundation of their political beliefs, there is, must be, a difference" Malcolm Cyrus 
















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