Welcome

Welcome
John William Tuohy lives in Washington DC

John Gotti’s ex son-in-law arrested in Cleveland organized crime raid


John Gotti's former son in law Carmine Agnello was arrested last night in Cleveland. Following the most recent story (first story below) I have reprinted two stories concerning Agnello from the year 2002 when he was still with the Gotti family.


John Gotti’s ex son-in-law arrested in Cleveland organized crime raid

July 15, 2015, by Jen Steer

CLEVELAND- Cleveland police arrested a member of the Gambino crime family following an 18-month investigation.
Deputy Cleveland Police Chief Ed Tomba said detectives noticed a spike in car thefts in part of the city. Instead of the cars found stripped and burned out, most of the vehicles weren’t recovered. That prompted “Operation Goodfella,” a long-term investigation into a scrap yard at East 116th Street and Harvard Avenue.
Officers began serving search and arrest warrants Tuesday night and continued into Wednesday morning when they arrested Carmine Agnello at his Cleveland scrap yard. Agnello, a former son-in-law of the late John Gotti, is charged with theft, money laundering conspiracy and corrupting sports. Tomba said he specializes in illegal scrap metal rings.
Agnello defrauded a victim of about $3 million by weighing down cars with dirt when they were weighed as his scrap facility, Tomba said. He also is accused of illegally drugging race horses and more charges are pending.
“This was an outstanding operation by the Cleveland police,” Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty said. “I admire their determination to make sure the mafia does not take root in Cleveland again.”
This investigation also involved the New York City Organized Crime Control Bureau.
Agnello served time in prison from 2001 to 2008 for similar crimes in Queens, New York. After his release, he got married and moved to Bentleyville, Ohio.
Introduce a 20 per cent sugar tax, urge leading doctors

Leading doctors have urged the government to introduce a 20 per cent tax on sugar, in a report by the British Medical Association (BMA).
Kurt Wood
The report, titled "Food for Thought," argues that more measures are needed to discourage "The use of taxation measures on unhealthy food and drink products has consistently been found to have the potential to improve health, with relatively high taxation levels (in the region of 20 per cent) needed to achieve positive health outcomes," the report argues.people from maintaining unhealthy diets. In addition to the sugar tax, the report argues for stricter limits on the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks.
"While taxing a wide range of products is an important long-term goal, a useful first step would be to implement a duty on sugar-sweetened beverages [...] by increasing the price by at least 20 per cent."
The report is a response to a number of worrying findings in recent months: in May, a study by the Overseas Development Institute found that processed food has become significantly cheaper over the last 30 years, while the price of fruit and vegetables has gone up.
"This is an important way to help redress the imbalance highlighted previously between the cost of healthy and unhealthy products, which particularly impacts on individuals and families affected by food poverty."
Sugar is one of the most commonly blamed elements of unhealthy "Western" diets, and a number of studies have linked excessive sugar consumption to obesity, which in turn has been linked with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. That said, obesity is by no means the only cause of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; as many as 20 per cent of people with type 2 are of a healthy weight at the point of diagnosis.
Too often, escalating rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are blamed on the individual, with a number of public figures emphasising the need for "personal responsibility." This report does away with such thinking, instead suggesting that the largely unregulated marketing of junk food is at least partly responsible.
Moreover, at least some of the blame should lie with a lack of regulation in the food industry itself: a report published in March found that some breakfast cereals contain as much as 33g of sugar per 100g. So far, unhealthy food companies have not been sanctioned. Instead, they have merely been asked to reduce the amount of sugar in their food, with no repercussions should they choose not to do so, as part of a "responsibility deal."
The sugar tax is a short-term measure designed to dissuade people from drinking sugary drinks by making them more expensive, but some critics have described such measures as "illiberal." Writing in The Spectator, Eleni Courea argues that such a tax would only attack the poor, and describes sugar taxation as a "pious, regressive absurdity": "Indirect taxes - including vehicle excise duty, air passenger duty, 'green taxes' and duty on tobacco, alcohol and petrol - make the poor poorer. A sugar tax will only add to this problem; yet another callous levy on the lifestyle of the poor.
"If the lifestyle of the poor is unhealthy, that is because long hours and low pay offer little choice. Kept afloat by tax credits - which may be about to undergo savage cuts - low-income parents do not have the time or money to invest in fresh ingredients and cook healthy meals. They could not be punished for this - what they need is packages of support to overcome the barriers to a healthy lifestyle."


Carmine Agnello


By John William Tuohy

First published: July 2002


"He's gonna get indicted someday, this moron" John Gotti.
With his father-law and brother-in-law behind bars, the government has decided to slam dunk, Carmine Agnello, husband of Gotti's daughter, Victoria.
The problem more or less started when Agnello also sued the New York Racing Association, which runs the Aqueduct, Belmont Park and Saratoga tracks, because they barred him for life from entering the tracks. Agnello said the ban is a violation of his constitutional rights.
The government responded with a raid of Sutphin Auto Parts, in Jamaica, Queens, business that authorities believe is owned by Agnello, police took a loaded .380-caliber handgun and a sawed-off shotgun in the store's office.
The handgun was found in a briefcase. The shotgun was taped to the underside of an office desk - with the barrel pointing forward, but since the weapons were seized using a search warrant that was overly broad and was based on police information that was improperly obtained.
Police asked for the warrant after a detective who was staking out the Auto Parts store during a stolen car parts investigation, saw an employee frantically taking objects from a desk drawer. The detective said he walked into the office, saying later he feared for his safety and feared evidence was being destroyed. Once inside, he saw ammunition boxes in an open drawer. Based on the detective's observations, a judge issued a search warrant.
A Queens’s judge later ruled that the police improperly seized guns from Agnello and that the detective should not have entered the office. The sworn statement "fails to provide a reasonable basis to believe [the detective] feared for his safety or that the destruction of evidence was occurring," Robinson said.
Agnello’s hair-trigger temper is well known within the Gambino operation, something his family members explained away as a chemical imbalance, regulated with medication.
Over the years, Agnello has scuffled with cops writing him traffic tickets,. And prosecutors say he threatened to break the fingers of a debt collector and put him in the trunk of a car, and the indictment says he threatened to hit a stockbroker with a hammer.
Agnello said he never threatened the broker but that the conversation occurred after the man lost $500,000 of Agnello's money.
Agnello was, apparently, difficult to work for. In one secretly recorded conversation he is overheard confronting a worker who is not piling enough cars onto an outgoing flatbed.
"Let me explain something," Agnello says. "If I lose money, you're going to get hurt. If I don't lose money, you don't have to worry about getting hurt. That's your job. That's why you're going to get hit when I come in, because you're lying to me,"
A while later Prosecutors dropped assault and harassment charges against Agnello because one of his alleged beating victim, Jose Pons, who had filed a police complaint claiming Agnello bashed him with a cellular telephone, refused to testify. Agnello said Pons fabricated the assault because he was fired by Agnello for stealing.
A product of Ozone Park, Queens, Agnello pursued Victoria Gotti against her father’s wishes, picking her up every afternoon in his Cadillac Seville at St. John's University.
"He was from the other side of the tracks - not in the financial way, but he represented danger," Victoria said "He kept following me, so one day we went out. My family was wild."
The two wed in 1984 and have three sons. As a father, Agnello earned a reputation as an indulgent parent was deeply involved in his children’s lives.
In January of 1999, the New York City Police Department decided to do something about the mob's stranglehold on the Big Apple's scrap iron market, so they set up a sting by opening a dummy scrap yard, called Stadium Scrap Metals in Queens.
Over a three-month period, undercover detectives brought in scores of dead car suppliers by paying top dollar, which caused a shortage of scrap for Agnello's business. That problem brought a visit from Agnello and his childhood pal, 390-lb. Joe "Jumbo" Burger. According to the Police, when they set up the sting, they weren't fishing for Agnello, rather, it was a trap he walked into.
According to police, Agnello and Burger told the undercover cops at Stadium Scrap that he wanted them bring their business to his company, New York Shredding, saying "I'm sure I can do business with you, or I can just run you out of business."
The undercover officers refused by telling Agnello they didn't want to pay the bridge tolls to send their cars from Queens to the Bronx.
The meetings between Agnello and the undercover officers were recorded inside the offices of Stadium Scrap.
Agnello: I'm going to be forward with you ... I'm telling you what we can do, we can do business ... or we are going to be banging heads.
Undercover No. 10: I deal with Johnny D.
Agnello: I'm gonna have to get back to you ... (pause) Mike, what I'm trying to say to you ... I can do business with you or I can just run you out of business. ... (inaudible) You can't make it.
Undercover: I don't know if you know, but people down here are a little upset with you guys down here, the way you do business. ...
Joseph (Jumbo) Burger: Who's that?
Undercover: Everybody.
On June 15, at Agnello's New York Shredder, 1340 E. Bay Ave. Agnello asks an unidentified man to throw a Molotov cocktail at Stadium Scrap, the undercover shop.
Agnello: Listen to me, all you gotta do is, all you gotta do is, buy glass bottles. ...
Male voice: And bust them?
Agnello: Yeah. And fill them up, and throw them all around the truck, all around the office.
Male voice: I don't even gotta open the gate?
Agnello: No, drive by, get a ... (inaudible) Get it, get it, I'll give you $2,000 ... (inaudible) glass bottles, real big water bottles. Throw them over the fence, throw them over the fence.
Male voice: All right, and just get it, everything all right.
Agnello: Get in your car, wing it, and keep on going.
The man was caught by police, trying to break into Stadium Scrap. The man agreed to cooperate and told the cops that Mark LoMonaco, a friend of Agnello's, had promised to pay him $2,000 to burn down Stadium Scrap and that Agnello had told him to toss ten gasoline-filled bottles into the yard. The police helped the informant set a controlled fire that burned parts of Stadium Scraps office.
He agreed to cooperate with the police and wear a wire. On June 21, the man returned to New York Shredder.
Male voice: Yo, I went there. There was only a flatbed in there I burnt. You heard it, right?
Agnello: You did?
Male voice: Yeah. I f-----g, I went in that yard, I burnt the flatbed. I didn't get the office. ... The crane guy started coming ... so I, I threw the gas on the flatbed, I burnt that s--t up, and I left.
A few days later, Agnello was indicted and charged with coercion, conspiracy, grand larceny, arson and restraint of trade and enterprise corruption.
They also had him on tape allegedly ordered the fire-bombings of two rivals, providing detailed instructions to a hired arsonist on how to carry out the plan using "thin glass bottles" and road flares. Another recording has Agnello bragging how a Bronx trucking company allegedly shut its doors less than two hours after Agnello personally threatened to put the owner and his partner "in the hospital" and "fucking out of business."
Taken into custody, he was held on $10 million dollars bail, prompting his then attorney, Marvyn Kornberg, to remark, "That's not bail, it's a telephone number."
His lawyers defended Agnello as an old-fashioned, six-day-a-week businessman with savvy "You don't find him in social clubs or out at nightclubs," said one of his attorneys, Larry Bronson. "He gets to work at 6 a.m. and he's there on Saturdays. He's a workaholic."
As they did in the Gotti case, prosecutors moved to freeze Agnello's assets, and had police follow Victoria and surround an ATM machine at a Pathmark store to keep her from withdrawing money from the family accounts.
And it was a list of impressive holding. New York Shredding Corporation was estimated to be worth $40 to 50 million dollars, and the scores of commercial and residential properties around the Queens' area, which he said he owned, have an estimated total value of $65 million. The couple's home in Old Westbury, Long Island, was worth $5 million which prompted the FBI to investigated how Agnello funded the house, on the premise that if the house could not be used for bail purposes if it was built with money obtained through crime.
The investigation showed that the couple took out a mortgage of only $850,000, unusually small for a house of that value, but, investigators were unable to trace the source of funding for the house.
A few days later, the Queens district attorney has moved to seize the house, bank accounts and two of Agnello's companies, New York Shredding and New York Scrap Metal. The FBI was also investigating Agnello’s ownership in CMJ Agnello Auto Parts, C&M Agnello Inc., Jamaica Auto Salvage, CMJ Glass Inc., Jamaica Auto Glass, Jamaica Auto Radiator, Liberty Mason Material, Avenue Concrete Inc., My Three Sons Carting and Queens New York Auto Parts.
Agnello appeared in court for the hearing, at one point loudly cracking his knuckles, and offered to agree to stringent conditions in the bail offer, including house arrest, electronic monitoring and limits on visitors.
His lawyer, Marvyn Kornberg, said the tapes show the district attorney overcharged his client. "You can't commit the crime of arson when the police officer sets a controlled fire by himself," he said.
An elderly Queens couple, Joseph D'Alia's and his wife, put up $120,000 for Agnello’s bail, however, the source of the funding was so suspicious that the hearing judge postponed bail while the offer was reviewed saying "It's almost incredulous on the basis of an alleged friendship that it would be of such magnitude to give Mr. Agnello a $100,000 gift," and that "especially when I noticed Mrs. D'Alia's appeared to be choking on the fact that she's paying over $120,000 out of her pocket and she's not going to get it back."
The D'Alias claimed to be longtime friends of Agnello's and said that Joseph had met Agnello 16 years before while working at Belmont Racetrack.
Remarkably, D'Alia worked as an hour wage guard for Wackenhut Security.
The couple agreed to put up as collateral their $400,000 house, which they said was inherited "from a sick friend" as well as $400,000 they won "playing slot machines at Harrah's in Atlantic City in 1992".
From Jail, the elder Gotti told Victoria "He's built himself a gallows. He's bought the noose. ... There's no question of my love for him, [but] he needs me out there. He needs me like white on rice."
After Agnello's release on $2 million bail , prosecutors charge, he went to Willets Point and showed business owners a picture of the alleged informant. They say he made the symbol of the Italian horns - pinkie and index fingers pointed outward - a symbol of death.
Agnello denied the claims. "I never threatened anyone or made any signals, nothing like that at all," Agnello was jailed again and the said he "is a danger to the community"
Then someone slipped word to the press that was having an affair with one of his employees. That eventually led to a divorce which ended the 15 year marriage.
The women, or rather, the women……the other was a women Agnello knew from his days growing up in Howard Beach, the third was the other was a woman he met at a scrap-metal yard…… who broke up the Agnello-Gotti relationship was the foul-mouthed Debbie DeCarlo ,a 36 year old, plain looking mother of two, who had a tattoo of Agnello's face, with his name spelled above it like a crown of thorns in the small of her back. But when prosecutors closed in on their alleged criminal activities, she tried to hide their intimate relationship from the feds and Agnello's wife, Victoria, by covering up his face with another tattoo, a bulldog - Agnello's nickname: "The Bull."
Agnello was obsessive and possessive of his famous novelist wife, but Victoria, grew suspicious of the time her husband spent with DeCarlo, and ordered Agnello to move DeCarlo out of the auto shop. "Carmine wants me to move out of his office [because] Vicki knows where I am," DeCarlo said.
Agnello sent her to a close friend's yard on nearby and then lied to Victoria that DeCarlo been fired and had moved out of the state.
However, word eventually reached Victoria that DeCarlo was back in the office, several times via bizarre, anonymous phone calls to her home. Victoria confronted her husband, who once again denied the truth, blaming the calls on vengeful FBI agents and insisting DeCarlo long ago moved out of state. But the calls eventually were linked to DeCarlo, who became so obsessed with Victoria she filed a complaint with cops where she lived on Long Island. She claimed Victoria was having her followed because she saw a car outside her home, sources close to the case say. The car was actually there to pick up a neighbor, cops later determined.
At times, DeCarlo seemed more in charge of Agnello's operations than he was. On the tapes, she is heard advising Agnello on business deals, yelling at him for not collecting debts, managing his financial ledgers and helping hide his ownership in various companies.
In a typical conversation, DeCarlo is heard giving Agnello a tongue-lashing for allowing an associate to fall behind in payoffs. "I would have thrown him out a f- - -in' month ago, the sick mother- - - - - -You put that man in business. It did not cost him a f- - -ing dime, you didn't see nothing, then he fights you for [payoffs],They all f- - -ing get over on you. "You put your price tag on loyalties and the ones that f- - -ed you, you keep letting them do it, You keep] getting f- - -ed . . . I get so pissed at you."
"Yeah, yeah, yeah," Agnello said.
In one of the most critical conversations, DeCarlo went through more than two dozen companies in which Agnello had an interest, most of them allegedly hidden behind fronts, giving prosecutors a road map to track Agnello's cash.
In a display of the pot calling the kettle black, berates a cousin who brought his girlfriend, to a social event, disrespecting his pregnant wife in front of friends.
"I know everybody plays the field. Everybody f- - -s around. No one's an angel. "But your wife is a good woman and you got two kids and one kid on the way. Have a little class for your f- - - - -g wife. You know you touch the oven, you're gonna get burned."
Then the cousin told Agnello that he might tell his pregnant wife about the affair to clear the air. "What, are you sick?" Carmine said.




As The Underworld Turns........The continuing heart wrenching saga of the mobs first family. 

By John William Tuohy


First published May 2000




John Gotti and his Uncle Peter
Get out your handkerchiefs and call your agents, those zany Gotti's are at it again.
In our last episode, Papa John Gotti, the mob father who never saw a camera he didn't like, was doing life in the can for, well....being John Gotti. Then, in a blatant case of "Monkey see, Monkey do" John Gotti Jr. went to jail on a five-year stretch for racketeering, extortion and other charges. Prosecutors said accuse young Gotti of being a gangster in training, but he denies it.
From his lonely, oh so lonely, eight x 10 foot prison cell in upstate New York, Gotti Jr. penned a fiery four page letter to the editors of the New York Post, attacking the recently arrested Mr. Sammy "the Bull" Gravano, and the Federal prosecutors who cut a deal with him. Mr. Gravano is currently a guest of the state of Arizona penal system.
In his letter, which did not come with drawings, but did include many words with two syllables or more, young Gotti referred to Gravano as "a person both small in stature and in heart," and an "animal" and a "coward."
"Make no mistake about Sam Gravano, this person, is not the tough guy he depicts himself to be......once his freedom was actually taken, he realized he couldn't handle it"
Then, in a dazzling display of rhetoric vaguely reminiscent of Aristotle, our young author asks "Why did these individual's sing this rodent's praise?" a subtle reference to federal prosecutors who once called Gravano a hero. This was followed up by a lightning-like literary attack that would make Mailer grit his teeth in envy, if in fact, he were to ever open a copy of the Post. "Because the government needed to sell this piece of garbage to the American public....[Snitches know], no matter what crimes you've committed, you can always "testi-lie' out of any problem,"
Relentlessly, Gotti then ripped into the Holiest of Holy's in the underworld....Gravano's moniker "The Bull", stating that Gravano's nick name came, not as he claims, local wiseguy who saw him tough it out in a street fight, but from the Bulls Head section of Staten Island he once haunted.
Will Sammy the Bull retaliate with a poison pen reply to the Prince of the Bergen Hunt and Fish Club in a Sicilian message that could spark a war of words resembling the Gore Vidal-Norman Mailer blood bath of yesteryear? Is the New Yorker magazine ready for this? Is Carlo Gambino rolling in his grave?
Well, right now it looks like Sammy the Bull might have plenty of time on his quick little hands to compose a counter attack in the years ahead.
The Bull was locked up recently in Phoenix on drug charges along with his estranged wife, son, daughter, and son- in-law. The complaint by prosecutors, who, as Al Capone once noted, are forever complaining about something, alleges that Gravano transported Ecstasy pills into Arizona and possessed them for sale.
If that's not enough, like everyone else related to this ongoing tale of misery and deception, the Bull has women troubles. It seems that Mrs. Bull, Debra, and her daughter Little Karen Bull, allegedly discussed drug sales and money laundering over the telephone, probably not a good idea in the best of homes, but a terrible concept in the Bull residence. Besides, the cops had a tap on the line at the time.
For those of you who have forgotten the media hype that made Sammy the Bull a jail house hold name, the 5 foot, 5 inch Gravano, who admitted to having participated in 19 gangland style slayings, including the murder of his own brother-in- law, testified against John Gotti and others, including the Pajama Don of the Genovese family, Vincent (the Chin) Gigante, who is a soap opera unto himself. The Bull did less than five years in federal prison and was released in March of 1995. Two years later, he appeared on television for two consecutive nights with Diane Sawyer to promote his book.
Speaking of which, on the brighter side of things, for Gravano anyway and dozens of other gangsters with writing ambitions, he did have some good news in March, when the New York Court of Appeals decided that the gangster didn't have to forfeit any book or movie earnings to New York State. In a 3-2 decision, the court ruled that Gravano's 1991 federal conviction put him out of the reach of the Son of Sam law, a well-intended statute that prohibits criminals convicted under state law from profiting from their crimes. The suit was filed by the daughter of one of Gravano's murder victims.
Gravano testified in federal court that year that he received a $250,000 advance from his publisher, but, sources close to the deal insist that the former mobster made at least a cool million from the book. The film version of the Bull's life, which could earn him mega-dollars, had been on ice, but will probably come into production in the next few years.
However, Sammy shouldn't rush off to the bank just yet, if in fact a guy in leg manacles can rush anywhere. New York's no-nonsense Pataki administration is reviewing the case and considering taking it to the state's highest court.
The Bull is also charged with illegal possession of a handgun. In Gravano's apartment, which he keeps separate from his wife's mansion, police found a loaded Ruger .357 and a .38 Smith & Wesson and a Walther PPK .380. Two of the guns were loaded. Police also found a phone voice changer and a blue bulletproof vest. In his wife's mansion they found six handguns, a Mossberg 12-gauge shotgun and a .44 magnum rifle, a .38 Smith & Wesson, and a 9-mm semiautomatic.
Sammy apparently has trust and security issues overshadowed only by Gotti Juniors displaced anger.
Gravano's arrest should have absolutely no bearing in John Gotti's conviction, but, remember this, Sammy is facing a minimum of twenty years in the slammer if convicted. He's already served his time on the federal charges. He is a desperate man and desperate men are unpredictable. There's nothing stopping Gravano from reneging his testimony about Gotti if the Feds refuse to help him out of this one as well.
There's also two details that should be remembered. The Bull's lawyers say that cops violated Gravano's due-process rights by arresting him without a warrant and keeping him from seeing his lawyer for hours after he was in custody. The state admits that at least half of that is true and won't comment the other half, which speaks volumes. Also, discussion over Gravano's $5 million dollar bail were held behind closed doors, so Gravano's past cooperation with Federal prosecutors could be discussed off the record.
Back in New York, despite the rumors that the Gotti clan were at each other's throats, no small thing considering the players. Alleged Mafia member, Carmine Angelo, husband to Victoria Gotti, Papa John's daughter, also has women troubles.
Victoria has published a best-selling novel and is reported to have made a million-dollar advance from the book, which, if underworld rumor is true, had no effect on Angelo because the word is that Angelo's marriage to the Dons daughter is on the rocks because of an alleged affair Agnello had with an employee of his scrap-metal business.
Reports are that Agnello's hair-trigger temper, and leaps to violence have also marred the marriage, even though he is currently taking medication to control the outbursts. Agnello says its due to a chemical imbalance. Prosecutors deny it. They say Agnello's temper tantrums is a weapon that he has used to threaten to break the fingers of a debt collector and promising to beat up a stockbroker with a hammer after the broker lost $500,000 of Agnello's money.
Surprisingly, Agnello's style isn't appreciated by his fathers' in-law, who referred to his son-in-law as a moron. "He's gonna get indicted any day, this moron," Gotti told Victoria in 1998, during a recorded jailhouse conversation. "He's built himself a gallows. He's bought the noose. ... There's no question of my love for him, [but] he needs me out there. He needs me like white on rice."
Some said the marriage was over, but, as Mafia murderers from the Bronx to the Brooklyn bridge fought back tears, love triumphed as Victoria put up her mansion to bail Angelo out of jail. The Gotti estates are estimated to be worth a total of about $6 million dollars, which includes Victoria Gotti's half-share in the couple's $4 million Old Westbury, Long Island estate, and the million-dollar home of John, Jr. Agnello, 38, and six others are charged with racketeering, extortion, arson and tax fraud. Most of the charges stem from Agnello's alleged strong arm bid to take over a scrap-metal business operated by undercover police officers in Willets Point, Queens.
But the six million is a drop in the bucket when compared to Agnello's real estate holdings, some 29 properties in all estimated to be worth between $20 to $40 million. Agnello appeared in court for the hearing, at one point loudly cracking his knuckles, and offering to agree to stringent conditions in the bail offer, including house arrest, electronic monitoring and limits on visitors.
However, Federal prosecutors not only argued that Agnello, should be kept behind bars until after his trial has ended, but they also want to have the court seize Agnello's properties under federal forfeiture laws. And what a coup that would be. Agnello's company, the New York Shredding Corporation worth an estimated $40 to 50 million dollars, has made this alleged gangster one of the biggest players in the New York-New Jersey area's enormous scrap metal industry. He is also reported to own scores of commercial and residential properties around the Queens' area, which have an estimated total value of $65 million. He also has business interest in concrete, waste, auto repair and junkyard's.
The feds say that Agnello's astounding success in capturing the Queens scrap metal business comes from his connections within the Gambino crime family which used extortion, arson and threats against competitors.
Agnello denies it, and not surprisingly, so do his lawyers.
But the cops appear to have proof. They say that in January of 1999, the New York City Police Department decided to do something about the mobs strangle hold on the Big Apple's scrap iron market, so they set up a sting by opening a dummy scrap yard, called Stadium Scrap Metals in Queens.
Over a three-month period, undercover detectives brought in scores of dead car suppliers by paying top dollar, which caused a shortage of scrap for Agnello's business. That problem brought a visit from Agnello and his childhood pal, 390 pound Joe "Jumbo" Burger. According to the Police, when they set up the sting, they weren't fishing for Agnello, rather, it was a trap he walked into.
According to police, Agnello and Burger told the undercover cops at Stadium Scrap that he wanted them bring their business to his company, New York Shredding, saying "I'm sure I can do business with you, or I can just run you out of business," The undercover officers refused by telling Agnello they didn't want to pay the bridge tolls to send their cars from Queens to the Bronx. Shortly after Agnello's visit, a man was caught by police, trying to break into Stadium Scrap. The man agreed to cooperate and told the cops that Mark LoMonaco, a friend of Agnello's, had promised to pay him $2,000 to burn down Stadium Scrap and that Agnello's had told him to toss ten gasoline filled bottles into the yard.
The police helped the informant set a controlled fire that burned parts of Stadium Scraps office. Several days later undercover cops went to Agnello and agreed to work with him. A few days later he was arrested.
Meanwhile, Papa John Gotti is locked away for life in a federal prison in Marion, Illinois. The question is, is he writing is memoirs? Does he have an agent? And what about subsidiary right? Will John Gotti Jr. learn to deal with his displaced anger? Will somebody please take the pen from him? Will Sammy the Bull ever learn to deal with his trust issues?

Stay tuned. 

No comments: